Homestead Travel Guide

Ninety-five percent of this colorful park on Miami’s doorstep is underwater. Save for 30 islets and a mangrove forest fringe on the mainland, Biscayne is 173,000 acres of Caribbean-clear waters that wash over the sea-grass shallows of Biscayne Bay—and the world’s third largest coral reef.

Located in Homestead, just east of Everglades National Park, this commercial nursery specializes in orchids, particularly the Phalaenopsis and Paphiopedilums variety.

The Ernest Coe Visitors Center contains informative exhibits designed to educate the public on the history and the importance of the Everglades. The center shows introductory films that have encompassed everything from a park overview to the effect of hurricanes.

Do not leave Homestead without stocking up on tropical fruits like papayas, star fruit, lychees, atemoyas, or monstera deliciosa (which tastes like pineapple-banana) at the Robert Is Here fruit stand—where Robert Moehling has been peddling exotic fruit since 1960.

Home to many species of wildlife, this 0.8-mile trail through the Everglades begins at the Royal Palm Visitor Center. The path runs over the sawgrass marsh known as Taylor Slough, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Mystery: Made from 1,100 tons of megalithic-style limestone boulders—some heavier than the Pyramids' and bigger than those at Stonehenge—this unusual structure, located 25 miles south of Miami, was built from 1923 to 1951 by a single man, a diminutive Latvian immigrant named

The only park of its kind in the United States, the Fruit and Spice Park is a 37-acre public park filled with more than 500 types of fruits, vegetables, herbs, and nuts. Tours are offered three times daily, at 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m., and 3 p.m.

The Hell's Bay Canoe Trail runs through a complex mangrove ecosystem in the Everglades. So named because it was once considered “hell to get into, hell to get out of,” the trail takes paddlers through several small ponds and bays.

Go wild over the exotic orchids in nurseries.