Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) + The South

Restaurants in Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) + The South

Whether it’s a classic culinary temple or a local haunt, these Ho Chi Minh Saigon The South restaurants are destinations in and of themselves. Read on to discover Travel + Leisure’s picks for the best Ho Chi Minh Saigon The South restaurants and dining experiences. Browse our travel guides for insider information on food trucks, bakeries, cafés, coffeehouses, farm-to-table restaurants, diners, trattorias, bistros, pizzerias, ice cream parlors, tapas bars, noodle houses, sushi counters, fine dining establishments, and more.

Our global network of editors and writers selects the best restaurants in Ho Chi Minh Saigon The South to help travelers soak up the local scene and find authentic dishes. Whether highlighting an insider hot spot, a celebrity chef’s newest restaurant, a hip coffeehouse, or the best place for cheap eats, Travel + Leisure takes you there, serving up the best Ho Chi Minh Saigon The South restaurant listings. Below find T+L’s top picks for where to eat in Ho Chi Minh Saigon The South.

This tour group–friendly institution really does serve the tastiest pho in town. To get the full experience you need to come early for breakfast, when the clientele is all Vietnamese.

Run by Bien Nguyen, a 30-year-old Australian Viet Kieu, this high-priced upstart is both a see-and-be-seen nightspot (serving well-made cocktails at the street-level bar) and a high-end restaurant with ambitious, mostly assured nouvelle Vietnamese cooking.

Located across the river in Thao Dien, this English-owned café-cum-furniture shop is a huge hit among Saigon’s expats, who gather in the pleasant courtyard for simple dishes like barbecued phu quoc squid, grilled prawns, and crab salad.

The concept behind this attractive, open-air restaurant is brilliant: the owner recruited several dozen of the city’s most popular street-food vendors to ply their trade under one roof.

Should you tire of Vietnamese food and crave a heart-stopping infusion of butter, cheese, and cholesterol—in the form of escargots, Brie du Meaux, and saucisson sec—this tiny, charming bistro is for you.

A veritable fantasia of white leather and Lucite copped from Philippe Starck, this all-day café serves good lattes and smoothies with a lounge-y soundtrack, from early morning to late at night.

This dinner cruise along the Saigon River provides views of the city’s skyline and highlights Vietnamese culture. Cruises take place on board a replica of the Bonsai I, the double-decker dragon boat of the emperors.

Into an outsize wok the chef tosses a fistful of bean sprouts, pork, shrimp, and/or mushrooms, then pours in a slick of marigold-yellow batter, rich with coconut milk. The resulting crêpe is the size of a Monopoly board—so large it overwhelms the table, let alone the plate.

Fabulous buffet breakfasts at Opera are one of the biggest perks of a stay at the Park Hyatt. Don’t let the term “buffet” put you off: everything is impeccably fresh and well presented, and eggs, omelettes, waffles, and pancakes are all prepared to order.

Previously located downtown, this French-Italian restaurant moved to a more intimate space inside a restored villa in 2008.

Known for its upscale Vietnamese cuisine, Nam Phan is housed in a renovated four-story villa surrounded by landscaped gardens. Inside, the candlelit dining rooms are decorated with polished wood furniture, carved stone walls, and marble floors topped with large flower vases.

In Vietnam, restaurants with incandescent lighting generally serve dull food, while fluorescent-lit joints with toilet-paper dispensers for napkins turn out the tastiest cooking.