Hawaii

Restaurants in Hawaii

Hawaiian cuisine—once consisting mostly of fish, boar, and vegetables—now often incorporates Asian elements from China, Japan, and the Philippines. Considered by many to be the best restaurant in Hawaii (on the Big Island), the Kamuela Provisions Company is located inside the Hilton Waikoloa Village and serves fresh seafood along with perfectly prepared prime rib, lamb, and chicken. With jaw-dropping views of the ocean at sunset, reservations are strongly recommended. Another of the most beloved Hawaii restaurants is Jackie Rey's Ohana Grill, which has a casual vibe but top-notch food. Freshly prepared grilled meats, salads, steaks, and seafood are headliners on the menu. Finally, Brown's Beach House on the Kohala Coast has a changing menu featuring dishes such as Hawaiian ahi tuna topped with shredded green papaya and ogo ginger prepared at your table. It's located by the ocean and has tables among the palm trees; on most evenings, local musicians play. Of all the restaurants in Hawaii, this is one of the most refined. But be sure to sip from a coconut picked up from a roadside market.  

Located in the typical Hawaiian version of a strip mall, Anthony's is tightly packed with a few small wooden tables and rows of wooden shelves on the wall, displaying packages of coffee and other gifts for tourists to bring home.

Brewpub-restaurant at Waimea Plantation Cottages.

Located inside the Kahala Hotel & Resort, Hoku’s has earned critical praise for its inventive and upscale Pacific Rim cuisine, crafted by chef Wayne Hirabayashi.

A unique, alternative to the abundant Hawaiian fare on Oahu, the 12th Avenue Grill serves modern twists on classic American dishes. The small restaurant has only 14 tables filled with diners who come for its inventive menu. Popular selections include grilled Maui Cattle Co.

Nearly all of the herbs and greens used at this seaside restaurant come from Pacific'O's Kula farm, and eventual self-sufficiency is the mission. The ocean is a few feet away at the on-beach tables of this Pacific Rim restaurant, which has a strong Hawaiian influence.

Deliciously absent of tourists (and even lacking a sign), this no-frills diner is always packed to the gills with hungry islanders scarfing down pho (unadorned beef noodle soup), vegetables cooked in a clay pot, and bo nhung dam, the Vietnamese version of fondue: you dip raw beef in hot broth to

The farm-restaurant offers an 11-course sampling of its harvest, including lychees, longan, and mountain apples.

Shokudo translates to "dining room" in English, and this Honolulu eatery, part traditional Japanese izakaya and part sushi bar, is just that. The popular Japanese chain opened its first U.S.

This dinner-only restaurant at the Turtle Bay Resort overlooks the Pacific Ocean and balances formal white tablecloths with a relatively casual resort vibe. The name refers to its latitude in the Northern Hemisphere.

D.K. Kodama, a third-generation Japanese American, founded this Asian-fusion restaurant, whose name translates in Japanese to “third generation.” Know for its eclectic cuisine and inventive sushi, Sansei opened in Maui in 1996, and has now expanded to four locations throughout Hawaii.

Back when sugar plantations filled the area, workers would gather at lunch, and the “mixed plate” concept began when the Japanese, Koreans, and Filipinos started passing around their own ethnic group’s food to the other workers.