Hawaii

Restaurants in Hawaii

Chef Peter Merriman was one of the first to celebrate Hawaiian regional cuisine.

One of Little Village’s signature dishes, honey walnut shrimp, gets high praise from patrons. Other favorites are the mu-shu roll, hot and sour soup, orange chicken, beef chow fun, and fried string beans.

One of the North Shore’s prized properties features seven restaurants, but Lei Lei’s is the only Turtle Bay restaurant that offers views of the signature golf course.

Haleiwa Joe's provides a casual dining experience on the North Shore near the famous Rainbow Bridge, which is visible from the café’s covered outdoor patio.

After surfing, kayaking, or simply enjoying the north shore in the morning, many visitors have lunch at the white taco truck parked on Weke Road at the Hanalei Pier by Black Pot Beach.

At one time, Hawaii’s farms didn’t grow much besides pineapple and sugar cane. Chef Peter Merriman set out to change that, and he has been instrumental in the state’s food scene, effectively launching Hawaiian Regional Cuisine.

Quirky, family-owned hole-in-the-wall Irifune is one of the best finds (and best values), Japanese or otherwise, in Waikiki.

One of two sit-down restaurants in Hana proper, this casual eatery is a practical choice for tourists staying at the Travaasa Hana hotel, only a five-minute walk away, as well as those traveling through the city on day tours.

Surrounded by the lei stands and street merchants of Chinatown, the small, 80-seat Duc’s Bistro is a slightly off-the-beaten path Vietnamese and French eatery that has a faithful following among locals.

European transplants Donato Loperfido and Philippe Padovani shuttered their eponymous local restaurants before teaming up in 2008 to open ’Elua, whose name means “two” in Hawaiian. The concept: two distinct, seasonal French and Italian menus for mixing and matching.

What A luncheonette with surfboards on the wall, and sandwiches made with fish right out of the sea.

Who Owner Terry Thompson’s shop now has branches in Tokyo; only at the original location, however, are you guaranteed island-grown ingredients.

In January 2011, Hanohano was converted into an exclusive lounge for Sheraton Club Level guests.

In Hawaii, going to a formal dining room doesn’t always mean dressing up; attire is resort casual at this 44-seat, dinner-only restaurant. Warm-toned walls, a large chandelier, and a picture window overlooking the resort surround the square tables inside.