Harlem Travel Guide

Opened in 1968 in a rented loft at Fifth Avenue and 125th Street, the Studio Museum in Harlem has long been showcasing the works of artists of African descent.

North of Harlem and on the western edge of Washington Heights, Fort Washington Park extends from West 155th Street to West 179 Street.


Opened in 2009, Swing, A Concept Shop, is the creation of native New Yorker, designer, and globetrotter Helena Greene. The first to bring designer labels like Rick Owens and Racquel Allegra to Harlem, Swing’s well-lit white walls let the quality of each hand-selected item speak for itself.

Taking its namesake from the city's oldest standing bridge, this park is wedged between Amsterdam Avenue and the East River.

If you are a fan of documentaries, the Maysles Cinema more than delivers.

Overlooking a bend of the Harlem River in Upper Manhattan’s Inwood area, Swindler Cove Park is a relatively new five-acre park. Once an illegal dumping site, the area was cleaned up and opened to the public in 2003.

Founded by Brooklyn native Lisa Price, Carol's Daughter sells a full range of natural beauty products, including skin care, hair care, and bath goods, that has attracted the likes of Oprah, Mary J. Blige and Jada Pinkett Smith.

In Central Park is the New York Conservatory Garden - six acres of tranquility and order. The gardens are divided into three styles: French, Italian, and English.

The whitewashed walls of Atmos in Harlem are lined with cubbyholes filled with an extensive selection of running, skate, basketball, and casual sneakers.