The Hamptons

The Hamptons Travel Guide

It may be just ninety minutes from New York City, but when you visit the Hamptons, you enter an entirely different and refreshing part of New York State. The destination has gorgeous beaches, dramatic dunes, shingled windmills, and famous light that attracted artists like Jackson Pollock and Winslow Homer to paint in its hamlets.
The Hamptons are a group of towns on Long Island — perhaps the most famous area on Long Island — that have gained famed as the residence or summer home of some of America’s most elite. Thousands escape the hot city each summer to Southampton and East Hampton and their many hamlets and villages, including Sag Harbor, Water Mill, and Bridgehampton. They have miles of museums, quirky antique shops, and placid bays that are perfect for beach-combing.

Things Not to Miss in the Hamptons

• Let a Hamptons tour guide show you around Sylvester Manor, a 17th-century estate on Shelter Island
 • Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center at Riverhead offers an in-depth look at the ecology of the Hamptons.
 • The Montauk Point Lighthouse was built at the end of the 1700s and is well-worth a visit and photo-op.

When to Go to the Hamptons

For a respite from the crowds, the best time to travel to the Hamptons is before the tourists arrive at Memorial Day or after the end of the summer season at Labor Day. However, the Northeastern region gets quite cold in the winter, so don’t plan your Hamptons travel around the holiday months.

Articles about The Hamptons

On my first visit to the Hamptons some 20 years ago, I stayed with friends at a sprawling rental in Southampton. We hired a now-defunct taxi service (Mercedes-Benzes, of course) to take us to overpriced restaurants and red-rope clubs. It was exact...
Unlike Miami Beach and Fort Lauderdale Beach, two of the hotter hot spots on the southeast coast of Florida, St. Pete Beach—on the central west coast of the Sunshine State—is lazy and low-key, quiet and calm, unpretentious and unassuming. More old...
During the summer all New York City roads seem to end in the Hamptons. But with few decent hotels, the best way to spend the night has usually been renting ($200,000 for the season is not unheard of) or houseguesting (invariably a hellish proposit...
Behind a stucco wall in East Hampton, New York, is a refuge along the lines of an English manor, a wonderfully intimate house, idiosyncratic in this place where high style is defined by the perfectly weathered shingle. The new J. Harper Poor Cotta...
You can tell a lot about a person by the car she drives. I drive an 11-year-old Volvo sedan with no radio, a cracked windshield, and a heat shield that rattles like a diamondback when I go over 30 miles an hour. Cars, in my book, are a means to an...
The idea of touring wine country was in its infancy three decades ago, as Americans began to discover the joys of the Napa Valley, with its handful of B&B's and restaurants. Today wine tourism has exploded—not only in California, but around the wo...
First came the fishermen. Then came the surfers. Now the formerly scruffy enclave of Montauk, at the easternmost point of Long Island, has been colonized by fashion-forward boutiques and hotels that are one-upping the rest of the Hamptons with a r...
It's all about access in the Hamptons. And there's no better way to get on the inside track than to spend the night with a couple in the know. Year-round residents Sylvia and Gary Muller, owners of the Mill House Inn (31 N. Main St., East Hampton,...
Wintertime beaches are the stuff of romance—both the tempestuous, passionate kind of romance and the sitting-snug-by-a-crackling-fire kind. The vast stretches of empty shoreline, the relentless crashing of the waves, the long walks bundled agains...