Greece

Greece Travel Guide

Rebuilt in the 1940's on the site of a seventh-century Byzantine acropolis, the 14th-century castle is perched on the highest point within the medieval city. Nearly two and a half millennia of Mediterranean history are on display within the heavily fortified walls.

Seeing an ancient Greek tragedy—or Swan Lake, The Magic Flute, or anything, really—performed at the A.D. 160 Herodeon (Odeon of Herodes Atticus theater), with the Acropolis looming behind, may be the highlight of your visit to Athens.

With all that volcanic rock, not much grows on Santorini—except for grapes. Locally produced dry white and dessert wines are renowned throughout the country.

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The gardens are awash in color, the museum features an epic corkscrew collection, and the wines are nothing if not polished.

Rows of beach chairs and umbrellas line this hip, family-friendly, shallow-water beach east of Vouliagmeni. It’s privately owned, which means it has an entry fee ($8) but is also pristine and has a multitude of facilities, such as a beach bar, showers, waterslides, and water sports.

Head to Alexandra for large hunks of gold, including plates and trays. You'll also find silver and platinum earrings, necklaces, and rings, both from Greece and from the rest of Europe.

Ice cream is an all-night event on the island, and Blu, a bar-gellateria serves some of Lindos's best. The cocktails are equally sweet.

Perhaps the second most important venue for diligent tourists (after the Acropolis), the recently renovated mammoth museum has the amazing Greek collection you’d expect, from Neolithic clay figurines to the treasures unearthed at Mycenae to the crowd-pleasing prehistoric antelope fresco from Sant

The charming bookstore is run by a pair of hyper-literate Brits, who love films and books in equal measure. The shop hosts frequent readings, as well as midnight screenings on the outdoor terrace of both classic cinema (Casablanca) and contemporary flicks (Napoleon Dynamite).

The nouveaux riches of Athens love anything foreign—cars, TV shows, even coffee (some of Kolonaki’s snootier cafés refuse to serve café frappés, opting for the chic Italian import, cappuccino freddo).

Athens’s New Acropolis Museum opened in 2009 with at least two missions: to display Acropolis artifacts in a modern setting and to regain the missing Parthenon Marbles, removed from the ancient building in the early 1800s by Lord Elgin and sold to the British Museum in England shortly after.

Hedonism is honored at this club, which can accommodate some 1,000 gyrating merrymakers.