Greece

Greece Travel Guide

A who's-who of 20th-century Greek painters—from Fassianos and Maleas to Theophilos and Moraliss—reside in the small, well-preserved brick building.

This art and history museum is taking over Athens, with a large modern art and architecture annex on Pireos Street near Gazi; a complex of Neoclassical mansions near Kerameikos Cemetery housing a world-class collection of Islamic art (as well as part of the ancient city walls of Athens); the Koul

Funky Oia is hardly Santorini's center of nightlife, but Hasapiko is an exception. It specializes in strong cocktails, and all "nationalities, sexualities and mentalities" are welcome.

An entire floor of the eight-story flagship bookstore of the publishing giant Eleftheroudakis is devoted to travel books on Greece; another one is exclusively for crime fiction (in Greek, English, Spanish, and Italian)—just the thing for beach reading.

Just a short walk from the Harbor and Old Town, the Casino Rodos is a hotel, restaurant, and all-night gambling spot, with hundreds of slot machines, dozens of gaming tables, along with seven restaurants and bars (must be age 23 and over).

If touring ancient sites all day drives you to drink, bypass the touts luring you into Plaka’s mediocre restaurants and slip into this narrow, 100-year-old hideaway, allegedly the second oldest bar in Europe.

If you forgot to pack suntan lotion or your favorite perfume shattered in your carry-on, you'll have no problem finding replacements at the Santorini outpost of the beloved Greek one-stop beauty megastore chain.

Seeing an ancient Greek tragedy—or Swan Lake, The Magic Flute, or anything, really—performed at the A.D. 160 Herodeon (Odeon of Herodes Atticus theater), with the Acropolis looming behind, may be the highlight of your visit to Athens.

Years as agent: 25. Specialties: Greece, Turkey. Consulting fee: $250.

Local staff can arrange anything from a massage therapist to a picnic lunch at a secluded beach near one of the company's stylish properties in Mykonos, Crete, Paros, Santorini, or Rhodes.

Here the clay soils and mountain breezes, along with water so pure that nobody bothers to buy it bottled, create ideal growing conditions for Xinomavro (zeeno-mav-ro), Greece’s most intriguing red grape.