Greece Travel Guide

The sophisticated spot with views over the caldera is the perfect counterpart to Fira's more raucous late-night lounges. Opera drifts across from the sound system, leaving patrons free to sip champagne cocktails and admire the view in a serene setting.

The nouveaux riches of Athens love anything foreign—cars, TV shows, even coffee (some of Kolonaki’s snootier cafés refuse to serve café frappés, opting for the chic Italian import, cappuccino freddo).

Don’t miss a stroll on secluded Diakofti Beach—then try the fried zucchini balls at the shorefront food stand.

Just opposite the old Grand Master's Palace in Rhodes Town is an antiques store that is considered to be the island's top destination for ancient furniture, carpets, and decorative pieces. Its mosaic floors and airy gardens are works of art.

One of the great pleasures of the Athenian summer is enjoying a movie (and a souvlaki and a beer) alfresco at one of the open-air cinemas. The swankest is the Aegli, in the leafy Zappeio Gardens near Syntagma Square, which often plays Hollywood blockbusters with Greek subtitles.

Rebuilt in the 1940's on the site of a seventh-century Byzantine acropolis, the 14th-century castle is perched on the highest point within the medieval city. Nearly two and a half millennia of Mediterranean history are on display within the heavily fortified walls.

You can’t come to Athens and not visit the sacred rock. The world’s most famous acropolis (which means “edge of the city”) stands 230 feet high, with a 484,000-square-foot flat plateau; atop it is the Parthenon, designed by Pericles in the fifth century B.C.

With all that volcanic rock, not much grows on Santorini—except for grapes. Locally produced dry white and dessert wines are renowned throughout the country.

One of the most recent naturopathic products to sweep the globe is mastiha, or mastic; the chewy resin, which comes from trees grown and harvested only on the Greek island of Chio, reportedly has antibacterial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties.

The gardens are awash in color, the museum features an epic corkscrew collection, and the wines are nothing if not polished.

Head to Alexandra for large hunks of gold, including plates and trays. You'll also find silver and platinum earrings, necklaces, and rings, both from Greece and from the rest of Europe.

Athens’s second most famous rock, this limestone cliff is 908 feet above sea level; imagine the view.

Ice cream is an all-night event on the island, and Blu, a bar-gellateria serves some of Lindos's best. The cocktails are equally sweet.