Greece

Hotels in Greece

This seven-story property rises above a winding stretch of coastline between Athens and Cape Sounio, home to the Temple of Poseidon. The 88 rooms are stylishly sparse: pale wood furniture, crisp white bedding, opaque curtains.

Just a few streets back from the sea, the Archontiko Eleni Hotel is housed in a restored Neoclassical mansion dating from the 1890’s. Beyond the pale-yellow façade, the hotel is decorated with white marble accents, hardwood floors, and century-old brick archways.

Five minutes by car from the harbor, the Atrium Hotel has 29 rooms recently updated with mosaic tiling and cheery curtains, chairs, and bedspreads.

Built in the 18th century, restored in the 20th, and perfected when the property took on the Relais & Châteaux banner in 2009, Zannos Melathron offers the storybook experience of sleeping in a Cycladic cave-style manor house.

Located near an entrance to the Vikos Gorge, the hotel is also close to a natural swimming hole off the road between Papingo and Mikro Papingo.

Grand, contemporary white-stone building with the largest hotel rooms (averaging 810 square feet) in Athens. 

For those who love the isle of Mykonos but would rather avoid its mazelike town and its summer crowds, Pietra e Mare on the southeastern coast is your ideal Greek retreat.

The three gorgeous, airy rooms at the 1864-built Captain’s House are perched high up on a hill in the village of Oia, at the northern tip of Santorini. All have canopy king beds and embroidered bedspreads, and cross-vaulted ceilings with antique chandeliers.

Though not in the crushing center of Athens, this expansive boutique hotel offers much more than just back-door entry to the Acropolis.

This Mediterranean gem is set amid the lush gardens and fragrant pine trees of the Halkidiki peninsula, known for its charming villages, historical sites, and pristine white sand beaches.

Built into the cliffs overlooking Santorini’s Aegean-filled caldera, Mystique isn’t fully visible from the road. But descend about 30 steep stone stairs and you’ll discover sea-facing terraces, alfresco dining nooks, and an infinity pool.

Only five minutes from the pier, this small hotel was originally built as a private residence for Count Orloff of Russia in 1796. Renovated more than two centuries later, the property now houses nine guest rooms and a honeymoon suite decorated in a Mediterranean palette of blue and white.