Greater Portland + Casco Bay

Greater Portland + Casco Bay Travel Guide

Founded by Geoff Latham, this local food purveyor is based in the Buckman neighborhood, not far from the Burnside Bridge. The company sells sustainable, free-range game birds and animals to professional chefs, as well as the general public.

Famous for its iconic leather-and-rubber boots and canvas boat totes, and arguably the epicenter of Freeport shopping, the L. L. Bean flagship store, along with its ample parking lots, dominates a central stretch of Main Street—and customers buzz in and out by the thousands daily.

Downtown lounge with live music and DJs

Opposite Portland’s ferry terminal in a historic brick warehouse, Alison Pray and Matt James make the best baked goods around, and there’s almost always a line for their famous breads—country boules, focaccias, anadama, cinnamon raisin, pain de mie, baguettes.

Award-winning rug-maker Angela Adams may have stores all over the country, but her flagship showroom in Portland is just a few miles from the very island she grew up on, and where inspiration for her naturalistic, timeless designs first bloomed.

One of Maine’s great icons, the picturesque white-stucco, black-capped Portland Headlight marks the entrance to the namesake city’s busy harbor, and lies just seven miles from downtown in Fort Williams Park.

Located on the 500-acre Smiling Hill Farm, this award-winning creamery produces more than a dozen varieties of handmade cheese. The creamery is housed in the farm’s original red barn, surrounded by rolling green hills and 50 Holstein cows.

A chalkboard hangs above the counter at this Portland cafe, displaying a hand-written menu of drinks, soups, sandwiches, and salads.

On a quiet street just two blocks from L. L. Bean, in Freeport's old Masonic building, hides one of the finest jewelers in the state of Maine.

The Spread: The 30-odd growers and producers who gather on Saturdays in downtown Portland's Deering Oaks Park are carrying on a tradition that goes back more than two centuries (the city's first farmers' market opened in 1768).

Kris Horton is one of the anchor tenants in Portland’s Public Market House, a cooperative in Old Port’s Monument Square that opened back in 1988 and showcases Maine-made products.

Straight from central casting, this busy fish store on scenic Custom House Wharf, off of Commercial Street in downtown Portland, is the stuff of any seafood-lover’s dreams.

This angular I. M. Pei–designed building in the heart of downtown Portland is not only the city’s shining cultural institution; it also houses the state’s oldest museum (and with 17,000 objects in its collection, the largest).