Greater Portland + Casco Bay

Things to do in Greater Portland + Casco Bay

Award-winning rug-maker Angela Adams may have stores all over the country, but her flagship showroom in Portland is just a few miles from the very island she grew up on, and where inspiration for her naturalistic, timeless designs first bloomed.

Located on the 500-acre Smiling Hill Farm, this award-winning creamery produces more than a dozen varieties of handmade cheese. The creamery is housed in the farm’s original red barn, surrounded by rolling green hills and 50 Holstein cows.

Straight from central casting, this busy fish store on scenic Custom House Wharf, off of Commercial Street in downtown Portland, is the stuff of any seafood-lover’s dreams.

About 45 minutes northwest of the swinging big city of Portland is a pastoral bastion of good, pious living—the last active Shaker community in the country, albeit with eight members.

Wooden pharmacy cabinets line the walls, and the stock includes outfits used in films.

The Double-A affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, the Sea Dogs play an average of 70 home games each season at Hadlock Field, just south of the Back Cove.

You don’t have to be a history or architecture buff to appreciate the sheer monied fabulousness of this hulking Civil War brownstone on mansion-lined Danforth Street in downtown Portland.

Founded by Geoff Latham, this local food purveyor is based in the Buckman neighborhood, not far from the Burnside Bridge. The company sells sustainable, free-range game birds and animals to professional chefs, as well as the general public.

Downtown lounge with live music and DJs

One of Maine’s great icons, the picturesque white-stucco, black-capped Portland Headlight marks the entrance to the namesake city’s busy harbor, and lies just seven miles from downtown in Fort Williams Park.

A chalkboard hangs above the counter at this Portland cafe, displaying a hand-written menu of drinks, soups, sandwiches, and salads.

The Spread: The 30-odd growers and producers who gather on Saturdays in downtown Portland's Deering Oaks Park are carrying on a tradition that goes back more than two centuries (the city's first farmers' market opened in 1768).

This angular I. M. Pei–designed building in the heart of downtown Portland is not only the city’s shining cultural institution; it also houses the state’s oldest museum (and with 17,000 objects in its collection, the largest).

It’s only fitting that on Portland’s culinary alley—Middle Street—a fine bookstore with every imaginable title on food, wine, and culinary academia should sprout.