Greater Portland + Casco Bay

Things to do in Greater Portland + Casco Bay

Internationally acclaimed master woodworker Thomas Moser—known for his exquisite Shaker, Colonial, and Arts and Crafts–style furniture made from American hardwoods—could open a store anywhere, but the longtime Maine resident chose Freeport’s main street for his flagship showroom.

You’d think in a state with dairy farms aplenty that fine cheese mongers would be everywhere.

Famous for its iconic leather-and-rubber boots and canvas boat totes, and arguably the epicenter of Freeport shopping, the L. L. Bean flagship store, along with its ample parking lots, dominates a central stretch of Main Street—and customers buzz in and out by the thousands daily.

Opposite Portland’s ferry terminal in a historic brick warehouse, Alison Pray and Matt James make the best baked goods around, and there’s almost always a line for their famous breads—country boules, focaccias, anadama, cinnamon raisin, pain de mie, baguettes.

On a quiet street just two blocks from L. L. Bean, in Freeport's old Masonic building, hides one of the finest jewelers in the state of Maine.

Kris Horton is one of the anchor tenants in Portland’s Public Market House, a cooperative in Old Port’s Monument Square that opened back in 1988 and showcases Maine-made products.

Amid a cluster of other design and home-goods shops on Free Street, a short five-minute walk from the Old Port, this shabby chic boutique is chock-full of new and antique finds for the cottage home, and it’s a sheer delight to browse.

Rod Browne Mitchell’s seafood store and smokehouse has occupied a brick building in downtown since 1991. His company specializes in luxury items like caviar, fresh fish and shellfish, and smoked seafood.

Fittingly located just steps from the water’s edge on Custom House Wharf, this busy studio-cum-retail shop makes one thing: sporty, one-of-a-kind totes sewn from recycled racing sails.

Award-winning rug-maker Angela Adams may have stores all over the country, but her flagship showroom in Portland is just a few miles from the very island she grew up on, and where inspiration for her naturalistic, timeless designs first bloomed.

Located on the 500-acre Smiling Hill Farm, this award-winning creamery produces more than a dozen varieties of handmade cheese. The creamery is housed in the farm’s original red barn, surrounded by rolling green hills and 50 Holstein cows.

Straight from central casting, this busy fish store on scenic Custom House Wharf, off of Commercial Street in downtown Portland, is the stuff of any seafood-lover’s dreams.

About 45 minutes northwest of the swinging big city of Portland is a pastoral bastion of good, pious living—the last active Shaker community in the country, albeit with eight members.