Germany

Things to do in Germany

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

Arguably one of the world’s finest archaeological museums, the Pergamon sits proudly in the center of the city’s famed Museumsinsel (Museum Island), a collection of five spectacular museums that’s also a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Facing the lovely Gendarmenmarkt square, this vast, pillared space created by Berlin architects Pierre Jorge Gonzalez and Judith Haase is Berlin’s answer to Paris’ Colette.

This café and bookshop in the old Jewish quarter has become a meeting place for artists.

Tasty plates of cured meats and cheeses and an extensive, fairly priced wine selection.

The big open space atop the long Lufthansa check-in desk is home to an in-house art gallery, which features a changing cast of Munich-based artists. The endless white walls are an ideal context for big-scale canvases—and you’re not likely to see these artists anywhere else.

A kiosk, really—no chairs, just an open-air wine-bar-in-the-round, and in its center, a young man and woman pouring wine.

Herzog & de Meuron's complex offers a new spin on the 19th-century shopping arcade, its passageways and interior quadrangles distinguished by hanging plants, warped walls, and a sculptural sphere by the artist Olafur Eliasson.

Walter Gropius’s 1919 Bauhaus Manifesto championed the synergy of art and craftsmanship in design—and the sleek, beautifully made merchandise offered here reflects that marriage.  Many of the shop’s housewares and objets are iconic representations of Bauhaus design—like Marianne Brandt’s 1926 ash

Part church and part memorial, the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church serves as a reminder of the destructiveness of war and the human will to survive.

Magazine junkies relish Motto Berlin for its archives of artsy, hard-to-find publications.

In addition to annual trips to her native Germany, Elisabeth Landry travels extensively to other European countries each year, allowing her to offer accurate, first-hand advice in regards to local hotels, restaurants, and tour guides.