Germany

Things to do in Germany

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

Berlinomat sells mostly Berlin-sourced stuff: books, clothes, a cookie cutter shaped like the Fernsehturm (Berlin’s famous TV tower).

The club is the home of the World Championship for Chess Boxing, where the contenders play chess for four minutes and then beat each other up.

Housed inside an 1881 building designed by its namesake, Martin-Gropius-Bau hosts a variety of exhibitions related to art and culture.

For years, the German label with the French name had a slogan—“Unfortunately expensive”—that defined its niche perhaps too sharply. Fabrics are rich, colors conservative (navy blue and gray dominate), and the tailoring modern.

The gallery, located within the Kreishaus' passageway, displays the work of Iranian sculptor and cartoonist S. A. Mojavari.

The international insider’s magazine par excellence has opened a compelling shop with a collection of “new, forgotten, anonymous, commissioned, or reissued industrial objects and products”.

Housed in two adjoining buildings in the Allstadt district, this contemporary art gallery is one of the largest in Germany. Originally established in 1851, the Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe-Verein (Bavarian Arts & Crafts Association) was founded to promote the work of local craftspeople.

This festival includes fire-eaters and live medieval music as a backdrop to costumed craftsmen creating leather apparel, calligraphy, silver jewelry, baked goods, and hand-dyed clothing.

 

Dates: Late Nov.–Dec. 23

Olympic Pedigree: 1972 Games’ home to track and field, boxing, weight lifting, archery, modern pentathlon, swimming, wrestling, cycling, fencing, handball, gymnastics, judo, soccer, and volleyball.

 

Stay in the fashionable Mitte ("middle") district, since it's convenient to major sites including the Reichstag and Potsdamer Platz. Browse the area's many boutiques, including Bioladen, the organic-food store found throughout the city.

If you're planning to ride Bavarian's famous Romantic Road past rolling farmland and half-timbered villages plucked from an illustration of Grimm's Fairy Tales, leave the driving—and high gas prices—to Europabus ($13

Neo

The Call a Bike hotline connects you to a bike rental ride at any of a number of pick-up points near train stations or in the city center.