Germany

Germany Travel Guide

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

A grocery store in the front, and a deligthfully boisterous neighborhood restaurant in the back.

The name means “healthy impulse,” but passengers may find the massages—done in four chairs in the concourse area—as sybaritic as they are therapeutic. The house specialty?

Artisanal chocolate shop.

The most famous of Sylt's nude beaches, where Germans of every stripe let it all hang out as they lounge in wicker basket chairs.

The vodka martinis are excellent, and the bar’s architecture alone is worth the visit—this former GDR cosmetics studio is an open constructivist glass box that would rank with the best of Warsaw Pact design.

Over the past few decades, Galerie Max Hetzler has established itself as one of Berlin’s most important and successful art galleries. The gallery, which relocated to the Wedding district in 2007, is known for its exhibits of U.S.

Just north of Kampen, this beach is less crowded than Buhne 16 (it also requires clothing).

A serious car fan can while away hours kicking tires and smelling the leather at Audi’s big showroom above Terminal 1.

Four billion dollars and five years were sunk into the building of this supposed future-scape just so that one of its main squares—Marlene-Dietrich-Platz, mind you—could host a McDonald’s, a Starbucks, a sad-looking casino, and Mamma Mia!, the musical.

Start the morning in the 543-acre park in the city's center. Walk along the shaded paths to wind up at the Brandenburg Gate.

New York architect Peter Eisenman's haunting field of concrete pillars.

Once per decade since 1634, the Bavarian village of Oberammergau has put on the Passion Play—a performance that recounts the life of Jesus. The next show is in 2010. Tickets are hard to get, but are included on itineraries from Tauck.