Germany

Germany Travel Guide

Arguably one of the world’s finest archaeological museums, the Pergamon sits proudly in the center of the city’s famed Museumsinsel (Museum Island), a collection of five spectacular museums that’s also a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Facing the lovely Gendarmenmarkt square, this vast, pillared space created by Berlin architects Pierre Jorge Gonzalez and Judith Haase is Berlin’s answer to Paris’ Colette.

This café and bookshop in the old Jewish quarter has become a meeting place for artists.

Tasty plates of cured meats and cheeses and an extensive, fairly priced wine selection.

The gallery, located within the Kreishaus' passageway, displays the work of Iranian sculptor and cartoonist S. A. Mojavari.

The international insider’s magazine par excellence has opened a compelling shop with a collection of “new, forgotten, anonymous, commissioned, or reissued industrial objects and products”.

Housed in two adjoining buildings in the Allstadt district, this contemporary art gallery is one of the largest in Germany. Originally established in 1851, the Bayerischer Kunstgewerbe-Verein (Bavarian Arts & Crafts Association) was founded to promote the work of local craftspeople.

This festival includes fire-eaters and live medieval music as a backdrop to costumed craftsmen creating leather apparel, calligraphy, silver jewelry, baked goods, and hand-dyed clothing.

 

Dates: Late Nov.–Dec. 23

Olympic Pedigree: 1972 Games’ home to track and field, boxing, weight lifting, archery, modern pentathlon, swimming, wrestling, cycling, fencing, handball, gymnastics, judo, soccer, and volleyball.

 

The airport-as-spa-day theme finds its apotheosis here.

Pick up a bottle of cherry or plum eau-de-vie at the Alfred Schladerer distillery, run by fifth-generation vintner Heiner Ulmann.

This former margarine factory displays work from fifty international artists.

This bar boat moored by the Turkish market, is afloat with hipsters, punk rockers, and the occasional aging French tourist couple who have steered way off course.

Founded in 1987, the German Historical Museum is located in two buildings. The first, the historic Zeughaus, was built between 1695 and 1730 and houses the museum’s permanent exhibition, German History in Images and Artifacts, which covers more than 2,000 years of German history.