Germany

Germany Travel Guide

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

The hat shop in the trendy Schwabing district, sells haute headgear.

The most famous attraction in the Brandenburg capital city of Potsdam (an easy day trip from Berlin) is the elaborate, Rococo-style Sanssouci castle—Berlin’s answer to Versailles, created by King Friedrich Wilhelm II between 1745 and 1747.

Notorious Berlin club entrepreneur Heinz “Cookie” Gindullis has been a household word for Berlin’s revelers since he opened the first Cookies in 1994. After years of searching for a new home, Cookies’ latest (fifth!) incarnation has revived its old spirit in what was once a cinema.

Also known as Asamkirche, the church at Christmas is a Baroque jewel redolent of pine boughs and frankincense.

A futuristic shrine to the cocoa bean; for a sweet treat, dip a waffle into a giant fountain filled with 440 pounds of milk chocolate

The club hosts an energetic bingo night in addition to bills of see-them-now bands.

This famous beer hall has traditionally-dressed servers touting large steins of beer — even with breakfast. Hofbräuhaus' roots date back to 1589 as the city's first brewery, and the interior has some wooden tables and chairs that are more than a century old. Three floors can accommodate up to 3,5

Classes can be tailored to individual students' needs and time constraints. Activities include city tours, day trips, and cultural evnets. The program is offered in 13 cities across the country, including Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munich.

This venue has closed.

This branch of a London gallery put on a stunning display of Zhang Huan’s 13-foot-tall Berlin Buddha, which was made entirely of incense ash and took three months to disintegrate.

The name means “healthy impulse,” but passengers may find the massages—done in four chairs in the concourse area—as sybaritic as they are therapeutic. The house specialty?

Artisanal chocolate shop.

The most famous of Sylt's nude beaches, where Germans of every stripe let it all hang out as they lounge in wicker basket chairs.

The vodka martinis are excellent, and the bar’s architecture alone is worth the visit—this former GDR cosmetics studio is an open constructivist glass box that would rank with the best of Warsaw Pact design.