Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

Uma

Designed by Anne Maria Jagdfeld, Uma, an upscale Japanese and sushi restaurant, exudes a modern, Asian feel. The dining room is decorated in shades of gold and black, and the restaurant’s logo, a horse, appears in various incarnations, including statues and embroidered details on napkins.

A grocery store in the front, and a deligthfully boisterous neighborhood restaurant in the back.

The trendy Paris Bar is located in the Charlottenburg district and evokes the atmosphere of a chic Parisian brasserie. The restaurant has long attracted the city’s artistic and literary set, along with global celebrities, including Madonna and Robert De Niro.

Hunker down with a book and an appetite for an all-day breakfast.

Housed inside the Swissôtel Berlin, Restaurant 44 is a strikingly modern eatery. The upscale, contemporary dining room has dark wood floors, off-white chairs, modern art adorning the walls, and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Vau

A Michelin Star recipient, VAU opened in the Mitte district in 1997. The restaurant, located near the Gendarmenmarkt, serves the traditional German and French cuisine of chef Kolja Kleeberg.

There are no toilets at Burgermeister, which is somewhat curious as the place itself is really a toilet. No joke; it is actually a 19th-century cast-iron public bathroom that’s been recommisioned as an Imbiss, or snack joint.

This unassuming restaurant in Maybachufer draws patrons in with its French- and Algerian-inspired menu, serving such dishes as roast duck and fish platters. The menu changes daily and can be found haphazardly written on a chalkboard hanging in the restaurant.

This famous beer hall is housed in a 14th-century building directly across from the National Theatre Munich. The restaurant is divided into two levels serving two different menus, with the top floor providing a more formal experience.

This Michelin starred restaurant is widely considered one of Berlin’s best. Located just steps from the Brandenburg Gate, the dining room’s minimalistic amber interiors and gold leaf ceilings provide an elegant spot to dine in this energetic and edgy city.

The famous Munich beer hall has a branch tucked away on a quiet end of Terminal 2.

Enjoy the monstrously sized schnitzel perched atop a tangy potato salad made with onion and vinegar inn this folksy, low-ceilinged, crimson setting.