Restaurants in Germany

Open since the spring of 2007, this terrific Spree-riverfront steak house is still one of the city’s see-and-be-seen hot spots.

The Michelin Star award-winning Hugos is located on the 14th floor of the InterContinental Berlin and offers diners panoramic city views to complement their meals. However spectacular the views may be, the cuisine is not to be outdone.

Terminal 1’s market-style restaurant and bar (the only 24-hour establishment in the airport) features sekt (German sparkling wine) and serves coffee, cakes, and 16 flavors of ice cream, as well as Bavarian, Italian, and Asian cuisine, in a bustling food-court atmosphere.

A grocery store in the front, and a deligthfully boisterous neighborhood restaurant in the back.

The trendy Paris Bar is located in the Charlottenburg district and evokes the atmosphere of a chic Parisian brasserie. The restaurant has long attracted the city’s artistic and literary set, along with global celebrities, including Madonna and Robert De Niro.


Designed by Anne Maria Jagdfeld, Uma, an upscale Japanese and sushi restaurant, exudes a modern, Asian feel. The dining room is decorated in shades of gold and black, and the restaurant’s logo, a horse, appears in various incarnations, including statues and embroidered details on napkins.

Hunker down with a book and an appetite for an all-day breakfast.

Housed inside the Swissôtel Berlin, Restaurant 44 is a strikingly modern eatery. The upscale, contemporary dining room has dark wood floors, off-white chairs, modern art adorning the walls, and floor-to-ceiling windows.


A Michelin Star recipient, VAU opened in the Mitte district in 1997. The restaurant, located near the Gendarmenmarkt, serves the traditional German and French cuisine of chef Kolja Kleeberg.

There are no toilets at Burgermeister, which is somewhat curious as the place itself is really a toilet. No joke; it is actually a 19th-century cast-iron public bathroom that’s been recommisioned as an Imbiss, or snack joint.

This unassuming restaurant in Maybachufer draws patrons in with its French- and Algerian-inspired menu, serving such dishes as roast duck and fish platters. The menu changes daily and can be found haphazardly written on a chalkboard hanging in the restaurant.

This famous beer hall is housed in a 14th-century building directly across from the National Theatre Munich. The restaurant is divided into two levels serving two different menus, with the top floor providing a more formal experience.