Restaurants in Germany

A popular, Austrian-themed eatery overlooking the Gendarmenmarkt, Lutter & Wegner serves a menu largely composed of Austrian cuisine, including game dishes, specials like lamb medallions and entrecôte with béarnaise sauce, and the traditional wiener schnitzel served with potato salad.

One of the city's most highly-regarded restaurants, Borchardt was originally founded by A.F.W. Borchardt in 1853. Today, the restaurant is a go-to dining destination for visiting luminaries, and it has served the likes of Barack Obama and Mick Jagger.

Splurge on truffled pasta at this Potsdam restaurant housed in a waterfront mansion.

Wooden elephants and stone Buddhas announce the restaurant’s upscale Thai theme (though the menu is a mix of Thai dishes and sushi) with typical Munich extravagance.

The restaurant occupies the vaulted cavern of the city's royal stables, now encased within a modern complex built behind a Victorian-era façade. The salsiccia, however, is a little bit dry.

The canal-front restaurant spotlights regional dishes such as lamb with chanterelles, fresh tarragon, and apricots.

Located in the Hotel Adlon Kempinski are star chef Tim Raue’s twin restaurants. Uma is more low-key, with an open kitchen and a Japanese-inspired mix-and-match menu, and Ma Tim Raue veers more toward the eccentric (fish maw) and extravagant (diamond-label beef).

This vegan eatery was designed by Nitzan Cohen.

A long glass wall displaying hundreds of wine bottles from around the world—which you pass on the way to the second-floor dining room—makes a fitting entrance to this top-notch wine bar and restaurant.

Under a heavy timbered ceiling, tables of smartly dressed locals toast important occasions with rounds of schnapps and feast on crisp schnitzel smothered in creamed chanterelles. The sauerbraten—beef braised in vinegar, wine, and super-rich beef stock—can’t find anywhere else.

Bavaria is the heartland of simple, rib-sticking dishes heavy on the würstel, potatoes, and sauerkraut—accompanied, of course, by liter-size mugs of beer—and there's no better place to indulge in the cholesterol fest than alongside local residents in the mayor's basement.