Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

Surely the coolest vegetarian restaurant in the world; the restaurant is also a club. Menu changes weekly.

The Mediterranean-inspired fare is served in a cozy-chic Andrée Putman-designed space.

This upscale restaurant is located at the stylish Brandenburger Hof hotel and is overseen by Finnish culinary master Sauli Kemppainen, who has created a menu of his signature Mediterranean-influenced, Scandinavian cuisine.

The restaurant offers modern Italian cuisine and the most flattering lighting in town.

For lunch, order the signature Knödel (German dumplings).

One of the first upscale restaurants to grace Prenzlauer Berg’s leafy Kollwitzplatz square, Gugelhof has hosted some pretty A-list diners since it opened in the mid 1990s (including former heads of state Bill Clinton and Gerhard Schroeder).

Despite its name, this fine-dining restaurant is not actually a buffet in the traditional sense of the word. However, the small bistro does serve a wide variety of international cuisines, including American, Italian, and French.

Frarosa is a wine bar/restaurant where you drink all you like and pay whatever you choose. “You put two euros into the pig to begin,” the barman explains, pointing to a bank on the bar.

A Berlin institution and hot spot for the city’s elite, Café Einstein is housed inside a villa that once belonged to silent movie star Henry Porten. The café’s stylish interior recalls the opulence of a bygone era with parquet floors, red and gold curtains, and crisp, white tablecloths.

The restaurant occupies the vaulted cavern of the city's royal stables, now encased within a modern complex built behind a Victorian-era façade. The salsiccia, however, is a little bit dry.

The canal-front restaurant spotlights regional dishes such as lamb with chanterelles, fresh tarragon, and apricots.

Located in the Hotel Adlon Kempinski are star chef Tim Raue’s twin restaurants. Uma is more low-key, with an open kitchen and a Japanese-inspired mix-and-match menu, and Ma Tim Raue veers more toward the eccentric (fish maw) and extravagant (diamond-label beef).

Bavaria is the heartland of simple, rib-sticking dishes heavy on the würstel, potatoes, and sauerkraut—accompanied, of course, by liter-size mugs of beer—and there's no better place to indulge in the cholesterol fest than alongside local residents in the mayor's basement.