Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

Despite its name, this fine-dining restaurant is not actually a buffet in the traditional sense of the word. However, the small bistro does serve a wide variety of international cuisines, including American, Italian, and French.

For lunch, order the signature Knödel (German dumplings).

One of the first upscale restaurants to grace Prenzlauer Berg’s leafy Kollwitzplatz square, Gugelhof has hosted some pretty A-list diners since it opened in the mid 1990s (including former heads of state Bill Clinton and Gerhard Schroeder).

Facil, on the top floor of the Mandala Hotel at Potsdamer Platz, is reminiscent of the clean lines of the Neue Nationalgalerie down the street, and one is mesmerized by the two rows of chestnut trees—yellow and green in equal measure—shivering in the autumn cold on the attractive patio.

Nocti Vagus is the city's famous dark restaurant. Based on the idea that depriving a person of one sense with strengthen the others, Nocti Vagus serves diners their meals in complete darkness in the hopes that a lack of sight will enhance the sense of taste and the culinary experience.

The airport outpost of Munich’s favorite coffee roastery and gourmet shop (the Dean & DeLuca of wurst) features strong dark brews and Weisswurst, a delicate white veal sausage served with Munich’s signature snack—a fresh-baked pretzel with mustard.

Chef Stefan Hartmann adds a Mediterranean twist to New German flavors (think seared foie gras with beetroot and caramelized apples).

This formal wood-paneled dining room is one of the grandest in the city and the only one with two Michelin stars. Walking into the room you pass a rolling silver Christofle lobster press parked in the corner.

At the Historische Weinwirtschaft (“Historical Wine Inn”), a stone-walled restaurant with a wood-beamed ceiling, dogs and children run around freely, popping up every so often at tables, which had been made from an old wooden bed.

A Berlin institution and hot spot for the city’s elite, Café Einstein is housed inside a villa that once belonged to silent movie star Henry Porten. The café’s stylish interior recalls the opulence of a bygone era with parquet floors, red and gold curtains, and crisp, white tablecloths.

Frarosa is a wine bar/restaurant where you drink all you like and pay whatever you choose. “You put two euros into the pig to begin,” the barman explains, pointing to a bank on the bar.

One of the city's most highly-regarded restaurants, Borchardt was originally founded by A.F.W. Borchardt in 1853. Today, the restaurant is a go-to dining destination for visiting luminaries, and it has served the likes of Barack Obama and Mick Jagger.