Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

A popular, Austrian-themed eatery overlooking the Gendarmenmarkt, Lutter & Wegner serves a menu largely composed of Austrian cuisine, including game dishes, specials like lamb medallions and entrecôte with béarnaise sauce, and the traditional wiener schnitzel served with potato salad.

One of the city's most highly-regarded restaurants, Borchardt was originally founded by A.F.W. Borchardt in 1853. Today, the restaurant is a go-to dining destination for visiting luminaries, and it has served the likes of Barack Obama and Mick Jagger.

This vegan eatery was designed by Nitzan Cohen.

A long glass wall displaying hundreds of wine bottles from around the world—which you pass on the way to the second-floor dining room—makes a fitting entrance to this top-notch wine bar and restaurant.

A Bavarian restaurant with its own brewery and a huge indoor beer garden complete with slatted wooden chairs, Airbräu serves custom-made beer (try the Weissbier, a Bavarian favorite) at $3.30 for a healthy half-liter glass.

Though nominally Turkish, the restaurant also smartly plays with the flavors of the Mediterranean. In other words, the greasy döner kebab that feeds Berlin’s workers and party people is blessedly absent from the menu.

This sophisticated hotel-restaurant has a deep wine list.

Hunker down with a book and an appetite for an all-day breakfast.