Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

The restaurant sits on a Beaux-Arts– style pavilion jutting out from the side of the historic Hotel Anna Amalia.

Henne offers the moistest, crispiest milk-roasted bird to be found in Mitteleuropa, along with a décor that’s a celebration of Berlin as a working-class city, with its wooden ceilings, tartan tablecloths, and dingy, nicotine-stained walls.

This unique café is housed inside an 1882 building and exists in order to celebrate and promote German literature. The restaurant and café occupy two rooms in the building, and outdoor seating is available in the garden when the weather permits.

Reservations are essential at this tiny spot, which serves classics like suckling pig.

The walls of this trattoria are lined with vintage photographs of Italian families; the wooden tables are packed with fans of the paper-thin pizzas and the "Abbondanza!" vibe.

Käfer, located on the top floor of the Reichstag, the building that houses the German Parliament, offers diners unparalleled views of the building’s famous glass dome from its garden terrace. The cuisine is classic German fare, created from local produce.

The airport outpost of Munich’s favorite coffee roastery and gourmet shop (the Dean & DeLuca of wurst) features strong dark brews and Weisswurst, a delicate white veal sausage served with Munich’s signature snack—a fresh-baked pretzel with mustard.

Facil, on the top floor of the Mandala Hotel at Potsdamer Platz, is reminiscent of the clean lines of the Neue Nationalgalerie down the street, and one is mesmerized by the two rows of chestnut trees—yellow and green in equal measure—shivering in the autumn cold on the attractive patio.

Nocti Vagus is the city's famous dark restaurant. Based on the idea that depriving a person of one sense with strengthen the others, Nocti Vagus serves diners their meals in complete darkness in the hopes that a lack of sight will enhance the sense of taste and the culinary experience.

A popular, Austrian-themed eatery overlooking the Gendarmenmarkt, Lutter & Wegner serves a menu largely composed of Austrian cuisine, including game dishes, specials like lamb medallions and entrecôte with béarnaise sauce, and the traditional wiener schnitzel served with potato salad.