Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

Henne offers the moistest, crispiest milk-roasted bird to be found in Mitteleuropa, along with a décor that’s a celebration of Berlin as a working-class city, with its wooden ceilings, tartan tablecloths, and dingy, nicotine-stained walls.

The restaurant sits on a Beaux-Arts– style pavilion jutting out from the side of the historic Hotel Anna Amalia.

A car-delivery center accessorized with restaurants and shops. The swooping glass-and-steel leviathan, designed by Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, looks like a spaceship touching down.

This stylish restaurant attracts a number of German celebrities (Claudia Schiffer, Boris Becker). But the restaurant's North Sea-meets-Asian dishes, like fresh mussels in a sweet curry sauce, are also a potent draw.

Surely the coolest vegetarian restaurant in the world; the restaurant is also a club. Menu changes weekly.

A dark restaurant, unsicht-Bar is built upon the principle that a lack of sight will enhance the other senses, including the sense of taste. Diners are greeted in the lit foyer, where they select their drinks and meals.

This unique café is housed inside an 1882 building and exists in order to celebrate and promote German literature. The restaurant and café occupy two rooms in the building, and outdoor seating is available in the garden when the weather permits.

Reservations are essential at this tiny spot, which serves classics like suckling pig.

In a beautiful park setting in Saarland, the schizophrenic region that can’t decide whether it’s part of France or Germany, chef Klaus Erfort has earned three Michelin stars updating classics like venison, which he pairs with sherry and morels.