Germany

Restaurants in Germany

At Germany restaurants that specialize in the local cuisine, you will enjoy a bounty of hearty fare. The style of food is very meat-centric and savory roasts, like the traditional and delicious sauerbraten, a Bavarian Pork roast and hearty stews, like the meat and veggie-filled pichelsteiner. Traditional restaurants in Germany pair these substantial mains with equally robust sides, like potatoes or spaetzle, an egg noodle common in the country’s cuisine.

The country’s huge variety — there are thousands! — of sausages (known as wursts) are available at street carts and casual restaurants in Germany. Make it a point to try the currywurst, a delicious dish of curry sauce, fries, and sausage that is the country’s most popular street food.

Additionally, thanks to the country’s rich and very long history of brewing, some of the best restaurants in Germany for tourists to enjoy a laid-back afternoon of traditional eating and drinking are the beer halls. Different regions have their own beer specialties you can sample, and communal tables give you a chance to meet local residents.

Open since the spring of 2007, this terrific Spree-riverfront steak house is still one of the city’s see-and-be-seen hot spots.

The Michelin Star award-winning Hugos is located on the 14th floor of the InterContinental Berlin and offers diners panoramic city views to complement their meals. However spectacular the views may be, the cuisine is not to be outdone.

Terminal 1’s market-style restaurant and bar (the only 24-hour establishment in the airport) features sekt (German sparkling wine) and serves coffee, cakes, and 16 flavors of ice cream, as well as Bavarian, Italian, and Asian cuisine, in a bustling food-court atmosphere.

Vau

A Michelin Star recipient, VAU opened in the Mitte district in 1997. The restaurant, located near the Gendarmenmarkt, serves the traditional German and French cuisine of chef Kolja Kleeberg.

There are no toilets at Burgermeister, which is somewhat curious as the place itself is really a toilet. No joke; it is actually a 19th-century cast-iron public bathroom that’s been recommisioned as an Imbiss, or snack joint.

This upscale hipster locale is known for its glamorous bar scene. The venue also serves delicious Continental home cooking.

Over in Mitte, a mix of fashion and media types frequent this club, built under the tracks of the commuter S-Bahn train.

For a bite to eat, stop into this pizza restaurant popular with couples who come for the ballroom dancing.

This quaint café on Wiener Strasse is a popular Berlin gathering spot and welcomes diners with a distinct, neighborhood haunt feeling. The dining room walls are painted in reds and greens, and the space is decorated with everything from beer signs to palm trees.

So adored is Berlin currywurst (a hefty sliced pork sausage slathered in curry-spiked ketchup) that there’s even a new museum devoted to it. Curry 36, in Kreuzberg, is the place for a fix—especially after midnight.

A dark restaurant, unsicht-Bar is built upon the principle that a lack of sight will enhance the other senses, including the sense of taste. Diners are greeted in the lit foyer, where they select their drinks and meals.