Germany

Things to do in Germany

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

Notorious Berlin club entrepreneur Heinz “Cookie” Gindullis has been a household word for Berlin’s revelers since he opened the first Cookies in 1994. After years of searching for a new home, Cookies’ latest (fifth!) incarnation has revived its old spirit in what was once a cinema.

Also known as Asamkirche, the church at Christmas is a Baroque jewel redolent of pine boughs and frankincense.

Just north of Kampen, this beach is less crowded than Buhne 16 (it also requires clothing).

A serious car fan can while away hours kicking tires and smelling the leather at Audi’s big showroom above Terminal 1.

Oranienstrasse in Kreuzberg, the former center of radical West Berlin, is now one big sidewalk café spiced with kebab shops and leading-edge, cheap-chic boutiques like this one.

Lucky Lufthansa passengers with first-class tickets or rewards program ID can take advantage of one of the biggest and highest-tech lounges on the Continent.

This kitchenware empire stocks an enviable collection of tinted glassware.

Starchitect Daniel Libeskind’s boldly designed museum building—an angular assemblage of zinc-coated panels that’s been called both visionary and blasphemous—houses exhibits that pay powerful tribute to both the devastation and hope of the Jewish people.

The Reichstag, with its transparent Norman Foster dome and top-notch collection of contemporary art (cue Gerhard Richter’s stunning interpretation of the German flag in the lobby), is a blessing upon the urban grid and a serious statement about Western democracy’s chances of survival.

Located in Tiergarten, the Gemäldegalerie is one of the most highly regarded museums in Germany. The museum’s collection, founded in 1830, contains European art dating from the 13th through the 18th century.

The classic porcelain manufacturer has enlisted artists like Ted Muehling to create modernist vases and chic caviar spoons.