Germany

Things to do in Germany

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

Lucky Lufthansa passengers with first-class tickets or rewards program ID can take advantage of one of the biggest and highest-tech lounges on the Continent.

This kitchenware empire stocks an enviable collection of tinted glassware.

Starchitect Daniel Libeskind’s boldly designed museum building—an angular assemblage of zinc-coated panels that’s been called both visionary and blasphemous—houses exhibits that pay powerful tribute to both the devastation and hope of the Jewish people.

The classic porcelain manufacturer has enlisted artists like Ted Muehling to create modernist vases and chic caviar spoons.

One of Berlin’s most important art museums, the Alte Nationalgalerie, or Old National Gallery, is one of five museums located on the city’s famed Museum Island. The building, which resembles a Greek temple, was designed by Friedrich August Stüler and was constructed between 1866 and 1876.

Ever since Berlin’s first tented fashion week took place at Brandenburg Gate in the summer of 2007, the city’s up-and-coming fashionistas have been rapidly carving a high-style niche in the city.

Glyptothek, a Neoclassical temple built in the 19th century houses a collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. The best known of these is the Barberini Faun, of course, a kind of proto-gay icon depicting a naked youth asleep on a panther skin.

The seventh-story, glassed-in observation deck offers a nearly bird’s-eye view of the busy runway. For stranded travelers, the terrace is good for at least a half-hour’s worth of plane-spotting entertainment. Admission is $3; open daily 8 a.m.–10 p.m.

The museum has the world's largest collection, at around 75,000 objects of modern and contemporary design.

Located 15 minutes northeast of the city center, the Allianz Arena is home to Munich’s two major soccer teams, FC Bayern and TSV 1860.

The concert hall, by architect Hans Scharoun, is widely considered one of the best in the world and still the greatest artistic joy the city has to offer. The audience is seated like the U.N. General Assembly around the warm, glowing orchestra stage.

Located near Potsdamer Platz, the retro-inspired Victoria Bar has become a favorite haunt for locals looking to escape the harried city life. Inside the decor includes dark walnut tables, green booths, and dim lighting.