Germany

Things to do in Germany

One of the most popular things to do in Germany is visit its array of museums. The Ludwig in Cologne is the home of one of the world’s largest collections of Picasso’s work. The Gutenberg in Mainz features an astounding collection of historical printing presses, and the Kunsthalle in Hamburg is one of the most important art museums in all of Europe.

Aside from its cultural sites, there are several things to do in Germany that involve visitors with the country’s culture, such as Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair and is held annually in Munich. Autumn travelers who are wondering what to do in Germany need look no further than participating in this lengthy and exciting festival.

Additionally, the country’s beautiful landscape ensures nature lovers will never be left wondering what to do in Germany. It boasts several national parks, including the Bavarian Forest National Parks that features breathtaking vistas of endless, untamed forests; Berchtesgaden National Park which showcases one of the oldest areas of the Alps and the massive Watzmann Mountain; and the beautiful Altmuhltal Valley Nature Park, through which the Altmuhltal, a tributary of the Danube, runs. Nearly all of Germany’s National Parks offer guided tours, educational speaking series on the natural flora and fauna of the area, and phenomenal hiking trails.

This festival includes fire-eaters and live medieval music as a backdrop to costumed craftsmen creating leather apparel, calligraphy, silver jewelry, baked goods, and hand-dyed clothing.

 

Dates: Late Nov.–Dec. 23

Olympic Pedigree: 1972 Games’ home to track and field, boxing, weight lifting, archery, modern pentathlon, swimming, wrestling, cycling, fencing, handball, gymnastics, judo, soccer, and volleyball.

 

Stay in the fashionable Mitte ("middle") district, since it's convenient to major sites including the Reichstag and Potsdamer Platz. Browse the area's many boutiques, including Bioladen, the organic-food store found throughout the city.

If you're planning to ride Bavarian's famous Romantic Road past rolling farmland and half-timbered villages plucked from an illustration of Grimm's Fairy Tales, leave the driving—and high gas prices—to Europabus ($13

Neo

The Call a Bike hotline connects you to a bike rental ride at any of a number of pick-up points near train stations or in the city center.

When he’s not working at Selbach-Oster, twentysomething Stefan Jakoby, along with his brother, Peter, run this precocious young winery.

Take the tram to the Mauerpark flea market in Prenzlauer Berg, near the site of the crumbling Wall. Stop into one of the café stalls alongside the market for shots of glühwein, mulled wine spiked with rum.

In Kreuzberg, the Monarch bar, on the second floor of a hilariously dreary housing project, beckons the 40-year-old hipster who wishes to turn the clock back by exactly 15 years and is ready to groove to a disco version of “Hava Nagila” or the gypsy-punk band Gogol Bordello.

Located on Kohlfurter Strasse, the Barbara Weiss Gallery was established in 1992 and showcases the pieces of German and international artists. The gallery displays a variety of works, including sculptures, paintings, and photographs.

Childhood memories of Legos and Playmobil toys (formerly hand-painted, now machine-made) come alive at Vedes, which features a northern European fantasy selection of those brands as well as high-quality, handmade German wooden blocks and ring toys for toddlers.

A one-stop shop for photography junkies.

This eponymous gallery of one of the New Leipzig School’s founders shows the work of emerging artists.