Georgia

Georgia Travel Guide

Inspired by a trip to Spain, chef Kevin Rathbun personally designed this unique Spanish wine bar that has an excellent wine selection and scrumptious small plates.

Insider clout: For a couple’s seven-year-old twins, Udwin organized a separate safari itinerary that included a private chef (who whipped up pizza in the bush) and guides for kid-centric activities on land and water.

When R. E. "Ted" Turner bought WJRJ-Atlanta, Channel 17 in 1970, he laid the foundation for today's Cable News Network—the news organization still headquartered in Atlanta but known around the globe.

Twist’s shopping center location does not deter the well-dressed, and typically younger, patrons who stop by this Phipps Plaza spot after work to enjoy signature cocktails and happy hour specials.

Located in the vibrant Little Five Points district, Stefan's lays claim to being Atlanta's oldest vintage clothing store. Since 1977, the boutique shop has been selling evening 1920’s evening gowns and men's three-piece suits from the '40's and '50's.

The Sweet Auburn Curb Market has been located on Edgewood Avenue, in the very heart of Atlanta, since it first opened for business back in 1918.

Miles away from chain grocery stores, this locally owned and operated shop sells grocery products at nearly the same, if not cheaper, prices. Beside the mural-filled brick wall, a large painted sign with the store’s name indicates that patrons have found the right place.

Highly regarded by Atlanta foodies, this gourmet grocer on the Westside has individual "markets" devoted to freshly baked breads, artisan cheeses, and handcut meats.

Peoples is a high-end clothing store for women of all ages, specializing in designer items shoppers simply can’t find in department stores.

Top tip: While China and Japan have blue-chip courses, they’re usually accompanied by hefty greens fees.

The history of the world's most recognizable brand—which was created right here in Atlanta back in 1886—is documented at this fun, interactive museum.

The fort was built in 1736 to bolster British Georgia’s defenses against upstart Spain.

Roughly 90 percent of the island is a land protected for the public, and also, one might add, protected from them, by virtue of limited access to it. Ferries to the island from Florida and Georgia carry a daily cargo of about 300 day-trippers and camping-permit holders.