Freeport + Mid-Coast

Restaurants in Freeport + Mid-Coast

Fresh lobster rolls, fried scallops, and haddock chowder are just a few of the locally renowned specialties at this casual roadside restaurant, situated along U.S. Route One in Midcoast Maine.

Cod End consists of a cookhouse, fish market, and dock, all packaged into one locale. The outdoor deck is scattered with picnic tables, which is the preferred place to sit, weather permitting. Indoor seating and a to-go menu are also offered.

Located in the coastal fishing village after which it's named, Five Island specializes in fresh-caught crustaceans. There's no indoor seating; snag a picnic table on the dock overlooking the sea, and watch as the lobster boats come in and out of the harbor.

Eclectic, organic foods are the specialty at this downtown Brunswick restaurant serving everything from Cuban shrimp to beef Brisket. The interior is simple but inviting, with white tablecloths, squash-yellow walls, and framed artwork throughout.

The riverfront, monolithic brick Fort Andross Mill—which turned out countless bolts of cotton broadcloth in the 1800s and then for years stood derelict—has become one of the state’s great mixed-use spaces: antiques dealers, gallerists, and a new breed of restaurateurs all share the renovated buil

So you’re making the pilgrimage to L. L. Bean and the outlets of Freeport. When you can’t face another discounted duck boot, retreat to this popular spot on the South Freeport marina.

Co-owner and James Beard Award–winning chef Melissa Kelly drew on two influences when she opened her Italian restaurant in this renovated 1880s Victorian in 2000.

Thousands of miles from the Mexican border, in a residential neighborhood two blocks from Brunswick’s main drag, this funky cantina belies every cliché about dining in Maine.

Differentiating itself from the area's many cafeteria-style seafood shacks, this tapas bar and restaurant specializes in small plates designed for shared noshing over a pitcher of sangria.

Live and cooked lobsters are the draw at this low-key waterfront seafood shack, operated by the nation's oldest fishermen's cooperative.

Seven miles from U.S. Route 1 (turnoff opposite Moody’s Diner) is a Teutonic gourmand paradise. Founded in 1918, this friendly family-run operation—where it appears to be Christmas all year round—does a brisk business in delicious edible products from Deutschland.

For owners Bob and June Frost, it’s always time to make the doughnuts—with potato flour.

The ospreys are often circling overhead at Bagaduce Lunch, a no-frills take-out restaurant on a tidal river in Brooksville—and recipient of a James Beard “American Classic” award in 2008.