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21 rue Beranger, Paris, 75003, France

Held six times a year in and around Paris, the fair assembles in one spot up to 200 independent, small-scale producers from some 21 regions, including makers and growers of honey from the Auvergne; cider from Normandy; spice cake from Languedoc-Roussillon; Espelette pepper from the Pays Basque; lentils from the Berry. The event has the insider-y, narrow-and-deep feel of a professional food fair, with the friendly, leisurely difference that it was conceived for the public. The seven-euro admission buys the right to sample everything that is sampleable (the guinea fowl and Aveyron veal roasts will make you wish you knew someone in Paris with an oven). With patience you can make a meal grazing from stand to stand, if you don't mind abusing the generosity of the sellers. Tables, benches, and a bar serving coffee are set up to encourage peple to buy small portions of the foods on display and sit down to lunch. While 60 percent of the participants have farms or other operations you can visit, a quarter also offer lodgings. Information about visits and rooms is usually included on cards or brochures, so it pays to pick them up. Not every item at the fair is organic, but all producers adhere to an eight-point sustainable-agriculture charter, are vetted with on-site inspections, and are required to personally man their stand to conduct tastings, answer questions, and smile.

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Held six times a year in and around Paris, the fair assembles in one spot up to 200 independent, small-scale producers from some 21 regions, including makers and growers of honey from the Auvergne; cider from Normandy; spice cake from Languedoc-Roussillon; Espelette pepper from the Pays Basque; lentils from the Berry. The event has the insider-y, narrow-and-deep feel of a professional food fair, with the friendly, leisurely difference that it was conceived for the public. The seven-euro admission buys the right to sample everything that is sampleable (the guinea fowl and Aveyron veal roasts will make you wish you knew someone in Paris with an oven). With patience you can make a meal grazing from stand to stand, if you don't mind abusing the generosity of the sellers. Tables, benches, and a bar serving coffee are set up to encourage peple to buy small portions of the foods on display and sit down to lunch. While 60 percent of the participants have farms or other operations you can visit, a quarter also offer lodgings. Information about visits and rooms is usually included on cards or brochures, so it pays to pick them up. Not every item at the fair is organic, but all producers adhere to an eight-point sustainable-agriculture charter, are vetted with on-site inspections, and are required to personally man their stand to conduct tastings, answer questions, and smile.