France

Things to do in France

From classic must-see sights to insider hot spots and local haunts, there are countless things to do in France. How do you decide? Start with our travel guide and get our favorite France attractions and activities—shops, museums, parks, nightclubs, coffee shops, tours, and more.

Our international team of editors and writers handpick the best things to do in France to help travelers discover authentic, local experiences. Whether a hidden boutique with handcrafted products, a popular local festival, a bakery with a cult following, or a picnic-worthy park, Travel + Leisure guides the way, providing information and inspiration. From beaches and bars to cultural attractions and up-and-coming neighborhoods, our list will help you make the most of your romantic getaway, family vacation, or trip with friends. Below find Travel + Leisure’s top picks for what to do in France.

The island is monopolized by normal, regular French people of average means in the normal, regular business of being on holiday: riding bikes, picnicking, swimming (even though the water never averages more than 64 degrees), buying honey at the market, wearing out the plastic cafe furniture.

Score some of the best Breton striped shirts in the region.

The haute fashion house of Vanessa Bruno is located in the city's sixth arrondissement. The daughter of Danish 1960’s supermodel and French fashion house founder Emmanuelle Khan, Bruno launched her line at the young age of 24.

Designed in the 17th century, Église St.-Sulpice is a “monument to the faith of past centuries.” Under the direction of Father Jean-Loup Lacroix, visitors can attend masses, lauds and vespers, eucharist adoration, confession, and rosary.

Founded ten years ago by master pefumer Frederick Malle, this perfumerie on Rue du Mont-Thabor keep its emphasis on the fragrance. Malle is the grandson of Dior Perfumes founder Serge Heftler and packages each of his 17 fragrances with a biography and picture of its designer.

Visit the archaeological site at La Graufesenque, where the Gauls made the pottery now housed in the Musée Fenaille.