France

Things to do in France

From classic must-see sights to insider hot spots and local haunts, there are countless things to do in France. How do you decide? Start with our travel guide and get our favorite France attractions and activities—shops, museums, parks, nightclubs, coffee shops, tours, and more.

Our international team of editors and writers handpick the best things to do in France to help travelers discover authentic, local experiences. Whether a hidden boutique with handcrafted products, a popular local festival, a bakery with a cult following, or a picnic-worthy park, Travel + Leisure guides the way, providing information and inspiration. From beaches and bars to cultural attractions and up-and-coming neighborhoods, our list will help you make the most of your romantic getaway, family vacation, or trip with friends. Below find Travel + Leisure’s top picks for what to do in France.

The island is monopolized by normal, regular French people of average means in the normal, regular business of being on holiday: riding bikes, picnicking, swimming (even though the water never averages more than 64 degrees), buying honey at the market, wearing out the plastic cafe furniture.

The rustic, typically Sètois bar is popular with residents, who come here for affordable wines and simple grilled seafood brochettes.

Located in the Nineteenth Arrondissement, the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is the steepest park in Paris. The 23-hectare park was commissioned by Napoleon III and officially opened at the World Fair of 1867.

Established in 1976 by perfumer-chemist Jean Laporte, this tiny French perfume house in the Marais woos shoppers with rows of impeccably packaged fragrances, candles, and sachets created from high-quality, raw materials (Laporte later left the company to form rival Maître Parfumeur et Gantier.).

If there is a Belgian "look" in today's interior design, it is captured in this flagship of the three Flamant brothers' stores.

Just off the D2 highway—known as the Route des Châteaux—this 128-acre winery is easily recognizable by its two conical turrets rising behind a wrought-iron railing.

Opened by French-American Vanessa Elia in 2004, this high-end flower retailer on Avenue Paul-Doumer has a single overriding passion: to bring 150 varieties of the popular orchid flower to its Parisian devotees.