France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

A note on the door states in three languagues: Good food takes time. We have the food. Do you have the time? At Ferdi, owners Alicia and Jacques Fontanier take good food seriously.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

The mayor of St.-Jurs believed so strongly in a bistro/café/grocery/bread drop-off that he built this one with municipal funds.

Located beside the old Paris Bourse, Café Moderne serves a reasonably priced menu of both classic and contemporary French cuisine to a largely local clientele, including lunchtime crowds of black-suited bankers.

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.

With its resident DJ and even a bouncer, the Opéra Café is an oasis très design, as the French say, in the Papal City's principal square. At about $17, the lunch formule is a good value (appetizer and main course or main course and dessert).

Tables are shared, which most Americans are really not comfortable with, so you just hope for the best. The walls are hung with Hansi village scenes and the marquetry landscapes the Spindlers of Boersch have been chiseling since 1893.

Situated in Montmarte, this old-fashioned café is best known as the restaurant where Amélie Poulain waits tables in the 2001 film Amélie. While a steady stream of movie fans continues to arrive each day, the café remains a modest neighborhood eatery with a largely local clientele.

Wait out a stopover at this spacious lobby bar in the Sheraton, the only direct-access hotel in Charles de Gaulle Airport's Terminal 2. Just a short jaunt away from all terminals via rail concourse, the lounge provides a quiet retreat from airport commotion.