France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

Known for its large portions and friendly atmosphere, Josephine Chez Dumonet greets guests with joking waiters that speak a little English, and kitchen staff that will gladly stand for a picture.

The former mansion of Jules Pernod, creator of the famous anisette liqueur that still bears his name, now houses one of Avignon's newest restaurants, Numéro 75.

Situated in the Seventh Arrondissement, this small, lively bistro is often lauded as the best in Paris. Run by celebrated chef Stéphane Jego, the restaurant serves authentic Basque fare in a traditional bistro-style setting with closely packed tables and an open kitchen.

Not far from the Montparnasse Cemetery in the 14th Arrondissement, Au Vin des Rues is hard to miss with its red exterior and awning.

Owned by renowned French chef and restauranteur Joël Robuchon, L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon showcases the chef’s award-winning haute French cuisine. The restaurant, which opened in 2003, was designed by Pierre-Yves Rochon and is decked in Robuchon’s signature red and black.

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

The buckwheat crepes at Ti A Dreuz attain a rare level of delicacy and refinement.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

Located in the Ninth Arrondissement, just a seven-minute walk from the Gare du Nord (North Station), this tiny restaurant and wine bar specializes in authentic cuisine from the Alsace region. Inside, the casual eatery is adorned with decorative tiling, warm wood paneling, and local artwork.

Freshly baked bread and traditional Corsican wild boar, served under a 150-year-old tree at the charming Hôtel Le Magnolia.