Restaurants in France

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

One of the contemporary bistros in Arles

For a late-night snack head to Nissa Socca for ratatouille and a version of socca (chickpea pancakes).

This small Paris restaurant celebrates the flavors of jamón ibérico, a high-quality Spanish ham. This particular charcuterie is cured for up to 42 months, and Bellota-Bellota serves it alongside tapas and in sandwiches.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.

The cooking here is on such a high level it seems mean to more rustic winstube to put them and the Illwald in the same pot. On the other hand, at least everyone knows where the bar is set.

Since 1946, Au Pied de Cochon has been treating guests to thoughtful French cuisine with a focus on the almighty pig. Decorated in Art Nouveau style, the restaurant boasts elaborate walls adorned with mirrors and paintings of ladies, red leather banquettes, wood accented ceilings, and twinkling c

Order the baked-Camembert salad.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.