France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

A good traditional restaurant. Order the lobster, caught daily in the Bay of Biscay.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

This winstub was founded in 1873, but it was Yvonne Haller who, running the place from 1954 to 2001, gave it institution status as “the Lipp of Strasbourg” (the reference is to the famously snooty Paris brasserie).

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

This historic grocer, opened in 1854 on Paris’s Place de la Madeleine, has an outlet with counter seating in the Galerie Parisienne, where you can stop in for (or take out) coffee, baguette sandwiches, and food gifts, such as jam or tins of rich butter cookies.

This wine store-cum-restaurant is a new idiom on the Parisian dining scene, and a welcome one.

One of the oldest wine bars in Paris, Taverne Henri IV is located near the Pont Neuf (New Bridge) in the Place Dauphine.

Request a light white wine in this low-key bar and you’ll likely be served a chilled bottle for less than $10 that will go perfectly with a plate of seared calamari.