France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

The scruffy restaurant is easy to miss, but is something of a clubhouse for the wine elite. It provides on-site lockers for the winery owners to store their own bottles, so diners can simply crack open their family's case and swap with friendly rivals two tables over.

The Chef: Paul Bocuse, who basically invented nouvelle cuisine, is arguably one of the 20th century’s greatest chefs and best known for his famous Mont d’Or restaurant, L’Auberge du Pont de Collonges.

Bouillabaisse is such serious business that waiters display each of its main ingredients to diners before they order. The nautical-themed exterior may seem touristy, but the cuisine is considered the most authentic in the city.

 

This unassuming bakery on the cusp of the Luxembourg Gardens offers a range of pastries, breads, and lunch dishes. Its corner placement, with hanging flowers above the adjoining sidewalk, offers a chance to people-watch from either outside or through the large windows.

L'Assiette on Rue du Chateau has been a "go-to" restaurant since its opening in 2008, when chef-owner David Rathgeber, a student of master chef Alain Ducasse, began serving classic bistro dishes from his small, open kitchen.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).

Known for decades as Lucas Carton, Senderens occupies a site that's been home to Paris restaurants for three of the last four centuries.

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.