France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

At Madame Orlac'h's nameless salon de thé you can have a cream tea as good as any in Wiltshire while listening to Schubert and reading ancient copies of Paris Match. Silk-shaded lamps and Staffordshire spaniels garnish the mantelpiece.

The aptly named L'As Du Fallafel ("the Ace of Falafel") is situated in the heart of the historically Jewish Marais neighborhood of Paris, a cobblestone landscape freckled by a dizzying number of falafel stands and kosher butchers.

Fauchon is easily recognizable from its hot pink and black store front. The flagship store on Place de la Madeleine houses a patisserie and boulangerie that sell sandwiches, breads, and desserts; rows of pastries line the gold walls.

A famously funky, beloved restaurant on the mosquito-infested plains. Vintage photos cover the walls of this former ranch, many featuring the handsome Bob, a charismatic Resistance hero (Bob is a nom de guerre). Conviviality and generosity define the family.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Customers call the cat who freely roams this winstub by name: it’s that kind of place. L’Aigle is the only restaurant in Osthouse, A La Ferme the only hotel, so when you book a room at the one you automatically wind up eating at the other (both places are owned by the Hellmann family).

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

Food doesn’t come more traditionally Parisian than at this old school Les Halles bistro, commonly referred to as Chez Denise. Hearty portions of rustic French fare served on red-checked tablecloths focus on large, meaty offerings like offal, foie gras, marrow bones, and a steak tartare with a fol

Order a bowl of moules frites.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

Near the Jardin du Luxembourg on the Rue Gay-Lussac is a classic-French bistro that also serves as a wine shop and delicatessen.

Children can lunch on saucisse et frites (basically a hot dog without a bun and French fries) and ice cream at this outdoor café in the Luxembourg Gardens (enter on the Rue Guynemer side of the garden).