France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

Don't be fooled by the understated interior; this culinary institution, run by a Tropezienne family, is prized for its Provençal cuisine, such as the warm artichoke barigoule and rouille de seiche (cuttlefish with saffron mayonnaise). Reservations essential.

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

The restaurant’s 38-year-old chef, Fabrice Biasiolo, had been recommended for his reinventions of regional flavors. The petit déjeuner is a clever trompe l’oeil, while the term auberge doesn’t quite capture the chic, modern feel of the dining room.

Started by Lucien Legrand in 1945, the shop at Legrand Filles & Fils opens into Galerie Vivienne which sits atop the Legrand wine cellars. Legrand Filles & Fils offers a wine bar, gourmet food and chocolate.

With its Victorian candlesticks, whimsical paintings, chandeliers, and a house-cat that roams the restaurant, Petrelle has an elegant-yet-homey feel.

In the tourist-clogged hill town of Gordes, it's not easy finding a place to eat—a pleasant, authentic, and reasonably priced place, that is, among the tourist canteens and the high-priced restaurants. Le Bouquet de Basilic, tucked behind a souvenir shop, is an adorable discovery.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Housed in a historic 1890 building and immediately recognizable by its red facade, Aux Lyonnais is an inviting Parisian eatery dedicated to preserving the culinary traditions of Lyon.

Located below I.M. Pei’s iconic glass pyramid, this flagship of the Louvre restaurant complex serves an extensive menu of both traditional and contemporary French cuisine.

The cooking here is on such a high level it seems mean to more rustic winstube to put them and the Illwald in the same pot. On the other hand, at least everyone knows where the bar is set.

Since 1946, Au Pied de Cochon has been treating guests to thoughtful French cuisine with a focus on the almighty pig. Decorated in Art Nouveau style, the restaurant boasts elaborate walls adorned with mirrors and paintings of ladies, red leather banquettes, wood accented ceilings, and twinkling c