France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

One of the oldest wine bars in Paris, Taverne Henri IV is located near the Pont Neuf (New Bridge) in the Place Dauphine.

Reserve a streetside table at this small brasserie with well-priced dishes like grilled pork sausages.

Request a light white wine in this low-key bar and you’ll likely be served a chilled bottle for less than $10 that will go perfectly with a plate of seared calamari.

A standing-room-only tavern in the Sixth Arrondissement serving inventive tapas from France (macarons of boudin noir; brochettes of foie gras and piquillo peppers) and beyond (cubes of tuna tataki garnished with alfalfa sprouts), L’Avant Comptoir started as a place for diners to

The modest 35-seat restaurant in Arles has no written menu and a $67 lunchtime prix fixe. Rival Gault Millau had named Rabanel, the restaurant’s previously obscure fortysomething chef, its toque of the year in 2008.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

One of the contemporary bistros in Arles