France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

The modern ecru-and-teak cliffside beach club and restaurant is run by the Pourcel brothers of Paris’s Maison Blanche. The menu features Provençal and Italian specialties, such as tuna carpaccio and saffron risotto with asparagus, shrimp, and parmesan.

Built to withstand wartime assaults, the 13th-century Château de St.-Geniès has thick stone walls and antiques-filled rooms.

Just blocks from the Louvre, Efisio Mannai's Fellini restaurant presents another grand human achievement: fine Italian cuisine.

Much like the iconic landmarks nearby, Le Voltaire is a classic Paris bistro that stands the test of time in the chic 7eme arrondisement. Perhaps the restaurant’s riverfront location, emerald green awning, and shiny wood paneling outside gives rise to the high prices.

The unlikely people behind Pierrerue's only storefront are Maryvonne and Mark Marinelli, Americans in their forties who formerly owned a corporate catering company in North Carolina.

Just around the corner from Palais Royal and the Louvre, Maceo has been a popular spot for over 30 years for prominent guests such as President Eisenhower. Eighteenth-century walls frame the elegant yet casual restaurant enhanced by large mirrors and deep leather armchairs.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

A good traditional restaurant. Order the lobster, caught daily in the Bay of Biscay.

This winstub was founded in 1873, but it was Yvonne Haller who, running the place from 1954 to 2001, gave it institution status as “the Lipp of Strasbourg” (the reference is to the famously snooty Paris brasserie).