Restaurants in France

Sète is known for tielle, a covered pie made with octopus, tomatoes, onion, and garlic. The fish shop that Anne-Marie Marinello runs with her husband has some of the best tielle in the city.

Though it’s a local cliché, one must eat at this seafood brasserie facing the Trouville port. The place is the sort of French restaurant you dream—and have nightmares—about: the zinc accents, the paper-covered tables, and, of course, the comically abrupt waiters.

Follow the advice of Julia Child and visit iconic patisserie Rollet Pradier. The stone building, with its large front windows filled with enticements, has been a part of the Seventh Arrondissement since 1859.

Built to withstand wartime assaults, the 13th-century Château de St.-Geniès has thick stone walls and antiques-filled rooms.

For those who need to host a group (or be hosted) while in Paris, La Table d’Eugénie is a reception space for hire.

A note on the door states in three languagues: Good food takes time. We have the food. Do you have the time? At Ferdi, owners Alicia and Jacques Fontanier take good food seriously.

Located on a narrow street opening onto the Place du Forum in the heart of old Arles, this former charcuterie dates from 1942. The tiny space is now a winsome bistro with a modest décor of red velvet banquettes and pig figurines.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

Located on a quiet side street just off the Place des Victoires, this traditional wine bar and bistro is housed in a 17th-century stone building designed by renowned architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart.

Located beside the old Paris Bourse, Café Moderne serves a reasonably priced menu of both classic and contemporary French cuisine to a largely local clientele, including lunchtime crowds of black-suited bankers.

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

The restaurant’s 38-year-old chef, Fabrice Biasiolo, had been recommended for his reinventions of regional flavors. The petit déjeuner is a clever trompe l’oeil, while the term auberge doesn’t quite capture the chic, modern feel of the dining room.