France

Restaurants in France

Situated beside the Grand Canal in the Gardens of Versailles, this traditional French restaurant is a popular spot for lunch after a tour of the palace. Established in 1895, the brasserie retains its Belle Époque style with white-clothed tables, vintage French posters, and a curved wooden bar.

Founded as an organic wine shop that later added a supper club for friends, Le Chapeau Melon ("the bowler hat") in Belleville is now a restaurant that stays true to its oenophile roots and to the refined palate of chef and sommelier Oliver Camus.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.

L’Olympic Café serves African-influenced fare in the energetic Goutte d’Or district, a multiethnic immigrant neighborhood also known as “Little Africa.” Housed in a 1930’s Art Deco building, the café has an upstairs dining area and a downstairs concert hall, both of which are designed with subdue

Chef Jean-Pierre Xiradakis’s take on French country cuisine ranges from traditional rillettes to tripe crisp, to tomato ice cream.

From its roost on the second platform of the Eiffel Tower, Le Jules Verne is helmed by Alain Ducasse (since 2007)—which means the food is truly worthy of its location.

This unassuming bakery on the cusp of the Luxembourg Gardens offers a range of pastries, breads, and lunch dishes. Its corner placement, with hanging flowers above the adjoining sidewalk, offers a chance to people-watch from either outside or through the large windows.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.