France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

A note on the door states in three languagues: Good food takes time. We have the food. Do you have the time? At Ferdi, owners Alicia and Jacques Fontanier take good food seriously.

The mayor of St.-Jurs believed so strongly in a bistro/café/grocery/bread drop-off that he built this one with municipal funds.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

Facing the 17th-century Théâtre du Palais Royal, this 30-seat bistro is just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. Beveled mirrors, faux leather banquettes, and crisp white linens evoke the 1930’s.

Located beside the old Paris Bourse, Café Moderne serves a reasonably priced menu of both classic and contemporary French cuisine to a largely local clientele, including lunchtime crowds of black-suited bankers.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.

One of Sète’s newest restaurants is the friendly bistro run by Nicolas Dubois and his wife, Emma. Simple dishes take creative twists (think smoked herring offset with beetroot mousse).

This seafood brasserie faces the Trouville port.

Surrounded by the fashionable boutiques of Le Marais and situated on the winding rue Vieille du Temple, Au Petit fer à Cheval is the place to go to have a film-like "Parisian moment." Enjoy conversation with the neighborhood's regulars at the horseshoe-shaped, marble bar (this cafe's name means "

Essentially a hip neighborhood bar in the chic First Arrondissement, La Coupe d’Or is all about people watching from a sidewalk seat on one of the city’s most fashionable street corners. Located on Rue St.

In the village of Arbois, book a table at the Michelin-starred restaurant with wood-beamed ceilings, a log-burning fireplace, and a cavernous wine cellar.

Tapas-style dining is the mark of Le Salon d'Hélène, as is the southwest France cuisine created by the salon’s Basque chef-owner Hélène Darroze, who comes from a family of hotel and restaurant owners.

Just down from the Louvre on a Saint Honoré side-street, Le Garde Robe is an intimate wine bar and shop.