Restaurants in France

A famously funky, beloved restaurant on the mosquito-infested plains. Vintage photos cover the walls of this former ranch, many featuring the handsome Bob, a charismatic Resistance hero (Bob is a nom de guerre). Conviviality and generosity define the family.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

If you knew in advance that Le Marronnier had 500 seats you’d never go. But forget everything you’ve suffered in French restaurants that accept groups and, when staying in Strasbourg (at Le Chut, l’hôtel du moment), book a cab and cover the 6 1/2 miles to Stutzheim.

Owned and operated by Cambodian chef Dao Heng, this tiny, no-frills bistro serves classic French cuisine as well as a small selection of Asian-French fusion dishes.

Named for its own address at 20 Rue de Bellechasse in the Seventh Arrondissement, Le 20 is a crowded, noisy, Art Deco-style bistro run by the young owners Jean-Phi and Tristan.

The aptly named L'As Du Fallafel ("the Ace of Falafel") is situated in the heart of the historically Jewish Marais neighborhood of Paris, a cobblestone landscape freckled by a dizzying number of falafel stands and kosher butchers.

Emmanuel Renaut, one of Europe’s rising star chefs, trained for years with the legendary Marc Veyrat before opening his small restaurant in the smart Alpine ski town of Megève.

A traditional, yet innovative bistro in the Marais, Le Repaire is renowned for its wine selection and game specialties.