France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

Situated in Terminal 2F of Charles de Gaulle Airport, this Brasserie Flo outpost serves the same reasonably priced, classic French fare available at the bistro’s flagship location on Cour des Petites Ecuries.

Located in a former jazz club, La Société is part of the Costes brothers' empire, a portfolio of upper-echelon Parisian restaurants.

Philippe Starck’s redo of this Paris institution, including its Michelin three-starred restaurant, features some surreal touches, from table legs shod in fancy footwear to a frosted mirror (it’s literally refrigerator-cooled).

This Asian teahouse in the Second Arrondissement is known for its bubble tea, a Taiwanese green or black tea with gummy pearls of tapioca. (Bubble tea is typically sipped from a fat straw so as to make room for the pearls at the bottom of the cup).

Owned by Caroline Rostang, the daughter of French culinary giant Michel Rostang, L’Absinthe is best described as a New York-inspired French bistro. The restaurant nods to New York City with its urban chic design, highlighted by the oversized, antique clock on the ground floor.

The Senegalese specialties here have earned the restaurant a reputation as the best African fare in town.

At Madame Orlac'h's nameless salon de thé you can have a cream tea as good as any in Wiltshire while listening to Schubert and reading ancient copies of Paris Match. Silk-shaded lamps and Staffordshire spaniels garnish the mantelpiece.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

The aptly named L'As Du Fallafel ("the Ace of Falafel") is situated in the heart of the historically Jewish Marais neighborhood of Paris, a cobblestone landscape freckled by a dizzying number of falafel stands and kosher butchers.

Fauchon is easily recognizable from its hot pink and black store front. The flagship store on Place de la Madeleine houses a patisserie and boulangerie that sell sandwiches, breads, and desserts; rows of pastries line the gold walls.

A famously funky, beloved restaurant on the mosquito-infested plains. Vintage photos cover the walls of this former ranch, many featuring the handsome Bob, a charismatic Resistance hero (Bob is a nom de guerre). Conviviality and generosity define the family.