Restaurants in France

Housed inside Lavinia, one of Europe’s largest wine stores, Le Restaurant Lavinia is the ideal place to sample from the store’s collection of more than 6,000 bottles of wine from countries around the world, including Argentina, Italy, and the U.S.

Given that it sits in prime tourist territory, this small neighborhood bistro is all too easy to miss—or dismiss—but its loyal (and largely French) clientele knows better.

Situated in the trendy 11th Arrondissement, Bistrot Paul Bert is a classic French eatery with unexpected twists. Inspired by local flea market finds, the eclectic interior includes a bright mosaic floor, oversize mirrors, small wooden tables, and unusual chandeliers.

One of the oldest wine bars in Paris, Taverne Henri IV is located near the Pont Neuf (New Bridge) in the Place Dauphine.

At the original Angelina location near the Louvre, patrons sit elbow-to-elbow in the Belle Époque dining room, with its sweeping archways, chandeliers, gold accents, and dramatic lighting.

Request a light white wine in this low-key bar and you’ll likely be served a chilled bottle for less than $10 that will go perfectly with a plate of seared calamari.

Freshly baked bread and traditional Corsican wild boar, served under a 150-year-old tree at the charming Hôtel Le Magnolia.

This popular eating spot is located in the Marché des Enfants Rouges, a bustling open-air market in the hip, less-touristed neighborhood of Le Marais. The market, the oldest in Paris, has been around since the early 1600's and features cheese-mongers, fresh produce, and vintners.

This eco-friendly, two-floor eatery serves an all-organic menuconsider risotto topped with shaved truffles or a terrine of diver scallopsin a design-forward space replete with neon lights and slashes of vivid red and green.

Thierry Marx helms the kitchen at Château Cordeillan-Bages, a two-starred restaurant in Pauillac owned by Lynch-Bages winery. His reputation as both tireless innovator and spiritual leader of the region’s food renaissance lures many to the hotel’s sedate dining room.