France

Restaurants in France

Essentially a hip neighborhood bar in the chic First Arrondissement, La Coupe d’Or is all about people watching from a sidewalk seat on one of the city’s most fashionable street corners. Located on Rue St.

In the village of Arbois, book a table at the Michelin-starred restaurant with wood-beamed ceilings, a log-burning fireplace, and a cavernous wine cellar.

This small Paris restaurant celebrates the flavors of jamón ibérico, a high-quality Spanish ham. This particular charcuterie is cured for up to 42 months, and Bellota-Bellota serves it alongside tapas and in sandwiches.

When Jacques Mélac’s father opened Le Palais du Bon Vin here in 1938, it was a clamorous quarter of typesetters, printers, and smithies. Before and after work and during breaks they fueled up on vin de pays and handed their empties over the zinc to be filled for home consumption.

Dine on dandelion-and-marigold salad dressed in sunflower oil, a citrusy fresh goat cheese, and a cherry-and-almond tart. Specialties from Auvergne like pounti (a pork, Swiss-chard, and prune tartine) and tarte aux cèpes are often on the menu, which changes daily.

"In the heart of Lyon is a classic of its genre—a bustling French beer hall with great food. It's near the Gare Perrache, with makes it a particularly good late-night destination if you're arriving after hours by train.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Whether you're stopping in to buy foie gras from the grocery or settling in for a leisurely brunch or lunch overlooking the idyllic Canal Saint Martin, La Cantine de Quentin is a worthy destination.

After making a name for himself at Alain Passard's L'Arpège, chef Pascal Barbot opened L'Astrance in 2000.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).