Restaurants in France

Located below I.M. Pei’s iconic glass pyramid, this flagship of the Louvre restaurant complex serves an extensive menu of both traditional and contemporary French cuisine.

If you knew in advance that Le Marronnier had 500 seats you’d never go. But forget everything you’ve suffered in French restaurants that accept groups and, when staying in Strasbourg (at Le Chut, l’hôtel du moment), book a cab and cover the 6 1/2 miles to Stutzheim.

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

A good traditional restaurant. Order the lobster, caught daily in the Bay of Biscay.

A traditional, yet innovative bistro in the Marais, Le Repaire is renowned for its wine selection and game specialties.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

It is only fitting that Chef Cyril Lignac's swanky bistro in the city's lively Popincourt neighborhood would be housed in a registered historical monument, as quintessential French cuisine and vintage decor go hand in hand. Established by the Chardenoux family in the early 20th century, the names

Situated near the Place de la Bourse in the Second Arrondissement, this traditional French restaurant is located in the two-story building that was once home to Le Petit Coin de la Bourse.

It takes dedication to find this Vaugirard bistro, but Parisians who persevere are treated to an authentic, intimate dining experience. The naturally lit interior consists of black tables and gray hues, highlighted by plum accents and colorful pieces of art.

Continuing the tradition of the bistronomy that started in the 80's and 90's, husband and wife team Clément Vidalon and Cécile Delarbre bring their classical training to Le Bouchon et l’Assiette, a small bistro in the out-of-the way Batignolles neighborhood of the Seventeenth Arrondissement.