Restaurants in France

L’Olympic Café serves African-influenced fare in the energetic Goutte d’Or district, a multiethnic immigrant neighborhood also known as “Little Africa.” Housed in a 1930’s Art Deco building, the café has an upstairs dining area and a downstairs concert hall, both of which are designed with subdue

The scruffy restaurant is easy to miss, but is something of a clubhouse for the wine elite. It provides on-site lockers for the winery owners to store their own bottles, so diners can simply crack open their family's case and swap with friendly rivals two tables over.

Bouillabaisse is such serious business that waiters display each of its main ingredients to diners before they order. The nautical-themed exterior may seem touristy, but the cuisine is considered the most authentic in the city.


Professionals, grandmothers, and farmers in clay-caked boots crowding together under the slate-gray beams.

L'Assiette on Rue du Chateau has been a "go-to" restaurant since its opening in 2008, when chef-owner David Rathgeber, a student of master chef Alain Ducasse, began serving classic bistro dishes from his small, open kitchen.

Rino is the brainchild of Chef Giovanni Passerini, who honed his craft under the renowned Swedish chef Peter Nilsson at La Gazzetta. With seating for 20, Rino offers an intimate dining experience.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).