Restaurants in France

In the heart of the Golden Triangle, next to Les Champs Elysées, sits the Mini-Palais.

Located down a narrow street in the Latin Quarter, Da Rosa houses a delicatessen and a small eatery. A covered terrace sits in front of the black storefront while inside, blocks of pig legs are lined up.

The concise wine list here is a paean to France’s vin naturel gurus, such as the Jura region’s anti-sulfur crusader Pierre Overnoy and Beaujolais renegade Philippe Jambon.

Across from Norte Dame on the Left Bank, this bistro serves a combination of classic and modern French cuisine imagined by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy.

Formerly the restaurant of the Hôtel d'Orsay, this Belle Èpoque dining room is much the same as it was when it first opened in 1900. Located on the first floor of the museum, the restaurant is adorned with crystal chandeliers, a frescoed ceiling, and tall arched windows overlooking the Seine.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain with a minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

Clued-in locals and famous food critics swear by this tatty Auvergnate bistro de quartier right off the Place Vendôme.

Order homemade rosemary and vanilla pink-pepper ice cream to eat during a walk along the fie mile Promenade des Anglais.

Located near the historic Garden of Tuileries, Rouge Saint Honoré is a Mediterranean-inspired Paris restaurant serving vegetable- and fruit-centric dishes. The chef utilizes the freshest available produce, including over 600 varieties of tomatoes, to create tempting salads and mains.

If the adorably modest little bar didn’t tell you you were in a zinc, the conversation would ("L’OM a bien joué hier soir, eh?"). Soccer talk is as central to zinc culture as the crocheted curtains, indestructible Duralex tumblers, and gratinéed pork chops here.

Dine on dandelion-and-marigold salad dressed in sunflower oil, a citrusy fresh goat cheese, and a cherry-and-almond tart. Specialties from Auvergne like pounti (a pork, Swiss-chard, and prune tartine) and tarte aux cèpes are often on the menu, which changes daily.