France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

A modern interior with blond wood and translucent plastic chairs sets the stage for trendy Parisians and tourists who might want a switch from traditional French fare. The family-owned and operated Little Italy Trattoria serves generous portions of fresh pasta and salads in Le Marais.

In 2011, the cuisine of head chef Christopher Hache earned a Michelin star for Les Ambassadeurs.

Classic Mediterranean tapas, in a historic town.

L’Estaminet is a bio (organic) restaurant run by wine vendor d’Arômes & Cépages inside the Le Marché des Enfants-Rouge, Paris’ oldest covered market.

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

The 146 year-old property once had guest rooms, a grocery, a café, and a gas station but now is a café-bistro only. Have some of the on-the-house sangria-like aperitif of red wine from the village cooperative, apple juice, and crème de cassis.

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

The French version of a mid-century American diner, Le Floors serves traditional greasy spoon fare as 1960’s soul and pop music plays in the background. Situated near the Cháteau Rouge Métro station, the café is housed in a three-story former print shop with a bowed glass-and-concrete facade.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

With its large population of North African immigrants, Marseilles has developed as a center of Maghreb cuisine. Located in the Arab Quarter, the cheery Sur le Pouce serves some of the best couscous in town, as well as tasty tagines and sweet, flaky pastries.

Acclaimed molecular gastronomy in the Médoc.