France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

This tiny bistro faces Biarritz’s famous food market.

Whether seated in the sunlight by the front windows, at the center room's bar, or beneath the back section's glass ceiling, diners find the red and gray decor and neo-bistro dishes reflected in Le Miroir's numerous framed mirrors (hence the name).

Located in the fifth arrondissement, known as the Latin Quarter, this wood-beamed bistro boasts a steel counter-topped bar and a wine cellar with 120 varietals.

The decades-old restaurant recently underwent a complete renovation, but thankfully the ambience and the menu—starring the best pizza in town—still remain the same.

Created by the editors of T+L for Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

In the fishing port of Vallon des Auffes, the idyllic L’Épuisette serves a proper Provençal bouillabaisse that’s oceans away from all others—brash and intense, rich with saffron and garlic and tasting unmistakably of the sea.

The widow of the late chef Bernard Loiseau runs this satellite of the long-standing family restaurant in Saulieu; 70 wines served by the glass are a highlight.

Located right by Cimetiere du Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement, Le Duc restaurant has been frequented by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the late President Mitterrand, who come to sample the fresh seafood.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

In a century-old house across from the train station in L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, a celebrated riverside town of antiquaires, Le Jardin du Quai is one of the best new restaurants in Provence.

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.