France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

KGB

Enjoy a quiet, delicious lunch just down the street from the town’s church.

Sète is known for tielle, a covered pie made with octopus, tomatoes, onion, and garlic. The fish shop that Anne-Marie Marinello runs with her husband has some of the best tielle in the city.

There is a subversive element of wit about the temporary Nomiya restaurant—a small glass box installed until July 2010 on the roof of the Palais de Tokyo museum in Paris.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Situated on the Quai Jean-Jaurès waterfront, this seafood restaurant has an enviable location facing the marina and its multimillion-dollar yachts.