France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

KGB

In 2011, the cuisine of head chef Christopher Hache earned a Michelin star for Les Ambassadeurs.

Classic Mediterranean tapas, in a historic town.

L’Estaminet is a bio (organic) restaurant run by wine vendor d’Arômes & Cépages inside the Le Marché des Enfants-Rouge, Paris’ oldest covered market.

Hanging bunches of pimentos add a spicy aroma to this small Basque restaurant in the Third Arrondissement. In contrast with its unassuming exterior, the dining room is designed with ocher-hued walls, oil paintings, and objéts d’art from the southwestern region of the country.

Located on the Ile St.-Louis, Mon Vieil Ami is run by acclaimed Alsatian chef Antoine Westermann. The small, lively space is decorated with stone walls, elaborate flower arrangements, and dark wood tables, including one long communal table.

Eat at the famous (and these days quite touristy) café on the Cours. You can sped hours watching the comings and goings.

Locals prize the Provençal-decorated spot both for its location—with views of the boat-filled Old Port and of the city’s skyline—and for its hearty food: peasant bread served with frozen olive oil, home-cured meats, oven-roasted pigeon, and an exceptional cheese tray.

The fresh greenmarket flavors at this crowd-pleaser are inspired in part by chef Grégory Marchand’s stint at New York’s Gramercy Tavern.

Café de Flore, which is situated at the heart of the chic St.-Germain-des-Prés, is a Paris landmark for its storied history, sunny terrasse, classic Art Deco interior, and broad menu offerings.