France

Restaurants in France

Gastronome or not, France is the place to go for great food. The country has a long history of not only rich, haute cuisine, but a tradition of excellent regional fare that has transformed France into the culinary giant it is today. It’s far too difficult to name just a few of the many great restaurants in France (though the famed Guide Michelin is always happy to help), so those visiting France restaurants should work overtime to try cuisine that is unique and native to the country like pot-au-feu, a hearty beef stew; matelote, fish cooked in cider; coq au vin or boeuf bourguignon, chicken or beef braised in red wine; and ratatouille, a rich vegetable stew. And don’t forget to drop by an authentic patisserie to stock up on madeleines, croissants, macarons, baguettes and all the delicious breads, desserts and cheeses that have set France restaurants apart as leaders in culinary excellence.

KGB

Continuing the tradition of the bistronomy that started in the 80's and 90's, husband and wife team Clément Vidalon and Cécile Delarbre bring their classical training to Le Bouchon et l’Assiette, a small bistro in the out-of-the way Batignolles neighborhood of the Seventeenth Arrondissement.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

Clued-in locals and famous food critics swear by this tatty Auvergnate bistro de quartier right off the Place Vendôme.

Order homemade rosemary and vanilla pink-pepper ice cream to eat during a walk along the fie mile Promenade des Anglais.

Alain Ducasse at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée, owned by chef Alain Ducasse, blends the finest French cuisine and impeccable interior design, providing the perfect atmosphere for romantic Parisian meals.

If the adorably modest little bar didn’t tell you you were in a zinc, the conversation would ("L’OM a bien joué hier soir, eh?"). Soccer talk is as central to zinc culture as the crocheted curtains, indestructible Duralex tumblers, and gratinéed pork chops here.

It is only fitting that Chef Cyril Lignac's swanky bistro in the city's lively Popincourt neighborhood would be housed in a registered historical monument, as quintessential French cuisine and vintage decor go hand in hand. Established by the Chardenoux family in the early 20th century, the names