Hotels in France

It's the only hotel worth anything, though hotel is a big word for what is really just an eight-room guesthouse. Open the windows to hear the sounds of the Siberian birds that nest nearby each spring.

Despite being in downtown Nîmes, jardins secrets feels like a romantic rural refuge, with 14 guest rooms and a small swimming pool shaded by orange and olive trees hidden behind a pink façade.

Before there was William and Kate or even Charles and Di, there was the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, who were the media sensation of their day. Re-opened in 2011, the couple’s private estate is available for rent.

Set in a 17th-century house, this hotel run by Yves and Claudine Camdeborde offers just 20 rooms. A five-minute walk from Saint-Germain-des-Près Metro Station, the pet-friendly property is furbished with original wood beams, antiques, and marble bathrooms.

The majestic 1910 hotel—which recently underwent a $30-million renovation—has grand public spaces and stately rooms filled with Louis XVI-style furniture. The 199-room hotel retains all of the grandeur of it's heyday, thanks to the crystal chandeliers, Roman arches, and Italian marble floors.

Maison d'hôte owners like Bernard and Charlotte Anne de Castellane are the last of their kind. To them, "French country" is the meadow in front of their château, not a style of gobbledygook decorating.

Ideal for a romantic getaway, this single-suite hotel contains five over-the-top rooms featuring everything from a private dance floor to a kitchenette stocked with cocktail ingredients.

Housed in an 18th-century mansion on Place des Voges, Le Pavillon de la Reine hotel has a vine-covered façade and a shaded inner courtyard separated from the square by an iron gate.

For classic French luxury with a hint of Italian swagger, look no further than the stylish Castille Hotel, steps from the haute-couture houses of Dolce & Gabbana and Hermès.

Le Corbusier's 1959 influential midcentury masterpiece still stands tall—12 stories to be precise—as a testament to pioneering postwar urbanist architecture. The massive, multicolored apartment block was designed to house 1,600 people in a vertical village