France

Hotels in France

Seeing as the world “hotel” has its origins in the French language, there’s obviously no shortage of hotels in France. Visitors will find everything from international French hotels to cute B&Bs and, another French word, plenty of chateaux (especially in the famed Loire Valley). And for those traveling on a budget plenty of hostels and hotels in France offer affordable accommodations perfect for the wallet-conscious traveller. There’s even a long tradition of work-to-stay France hotels that give visitors room-and-board in exchange for working French farms. Just be sure to do your research before booking a hotel in the country’s many cities and make finding an excellent concierge or enthusiastic local guide a top priority. Both can do wonders for a great French vacation.

A cluster of 37 Modernist villas and suites designed by Philippe Starck protégé Christophe Pillet.

Near the fortified port town of Concarneau, the Les Sables Blancs presides over an unspoiled strip of sand. The hotel opened less than a year ago, and has a mod, minimalist look, with bright orange chairs on a vast lantern-lit bar terrace where guests gather at night.

Decorated by Philippe Starck–trained Christophe Pillet, the new, 27-chambre Hotel Sezz is phonetically named after the 16th Arrondissement it calls home.

Oh, Paris: your palace hotels are turning up the dial, each one-upping the other with refinements. And this grande dame?

The historic Hôtel La Trémoille was built in 1883 and opened as a hotel in 1925. The hotel is situated in the 8th Arrondissement’s Golden Triangle, near the Champs-Elysées and the Avenue Montaigne.

A 12th-century château with 30 dreamy rooms, some with balconies over the gardens, others looking out over the Millau Viaduct.

Ideal for a romantic getaway, this single-suite hotel contains five over-the-top rooms featuring everything from a private dance floor to a kitchenette stocked with cocktail ingredients.

This high-design boutique hotel is surprisingly well priced considering its convenient location on a quiet side street close to the Place de la République and just five minutes from shopping in the Upper Marais.

Built in the 12th century as a Benedictine priory, the hotel is now a six-room oenophile’s getaway.

Historically, provincial maisons d’hôtes are a lot of things—deliciously louche, impossibly cute, poignantly decrepit—but rarely are they scene-y. L’Ange et L’Éléphant is the almost freakish, salutary exception, an all-in-one inn, restaurant, café, tea salon, and boutique.