France

Hotels in France

Seeing as the world “hotel” has its origins in the French language, there’s obviously no shortage of hotels in France. Visitors will find everything from international French hotels to cute B&Bs and, another French word, plenty of chateaux (especially in the famed Loire Valley). And for those traveling on a budget plenty of hostels and hotels in France offer affordable accommodations perfect for the wallet-conscious traveller. There’s even a long tradition of work-to-stay France hotels that give visitors room-and-board in exchange for working French farms. Just be sure to do your research before booking a hotel in the country’s many cities and make finding an excellent concierge or enthusiastic local guide a top priority. Both can do wonders for a great French vacation.

The cliffside hotel was built in 1872, with hanging eaves and wrought-iron balconies.

Michael Portos's increasingly lauded hotel restaurant serves reconstituted sunny-side-up egg with baby clams. Booking a room without booking a table at the in-house eatery is a crime.

French style by way of L.A., with a dash of baroque detail, defines this 1906 building, where photos of Hollywood and fashion types are matched with purple velour chairs and Venetian glass chandeliers against black lacquered walls.

Surrounded by Côte d’Or vineyards and stately barge canals, this 12th-century abbey has been revitalized with exquisite ornamental details: limestone arches supported by laughing gargoyles, heraldic frescoes, stained-glass refectory windows, and a marble spiral staircase to the adjacent château.

High in the hills of Auvergne, a five-hour drive south of Paris, the property isn’t for those seeking high-tech amenities or over-the-top service.

After buying Le Manoir de L’Etang from the family who had owned it for more than 50 years, Camilla Richards gave it a modern update, filling the ivy-covered Côte d'Azur villa with eclectic touches.

L’Aigle is the only restaurant in Osthouse, A La Ferme the only hotel, so when you book a room at the one you automatically wind up eating at the other (both places are owned by the Hellmann family).

This 30-room, 11th-century property is a remote Riviera getaway - if you don't mind communal meals and friendly wine-making monks.

Located two blocks from the Arc de Triomphe in the heart of aristocratic Paris, this old-world, 83-room palace hotel has remained in the same family since its founding in 1925.