France

Hotels in France

Esprit St.-Germain is a 28-room boutique hotel located in the sixth arrondisement between Boulevard St.-Germain and the Luxembourg Gardens, boasting striking views of the Romanesque-meets-Gothic St.-Sulpice church. The simple navy blue wooden façade outside signifies this hotel’s minimalism.

Set in a 17th-century house, this hotel run by Yves and Claudine Camdeborde offers just 20 rooms. A five-minute walk from Saint-Germain-des-Près Metro Station, the pet-friendly property is furbished with original wood beams, antiques, and marble bathrooms.

Philippe Starck’s public-space redo of this Paris institution, adjacent to the picturesque Tuileries gardens—including the bar and three-Michelin-starred restaurant—brought surreal new touches like a refrigerator-cooled mirror that’s literally frosted, and three-legged tables dressed in fancy sho

Designed by Frédéric Mechiche to resemble a Parisian townhouse, the Hôtel Le A is situated just two blocks from the Champs-Elysées. The chic, art-inspired hotel features 26 guest rooms decorated in shades of gray, white, and black with distinctive striped floors.

A private garden with towering potted trees and rare species of plants serves as the centerpiece for this five-star hotel in the central part of the city.

For a centrally located stay in Paris, consider the Pierre Seignol-designed Artus Hotel in the lively Left Bank.

A 580-square-foot one-bedroom apartment in Paris' Latin Quarter, accommodating up to four, with modern, all-white décor, a queen-size bed, a fully equipped kitchen, high-speed internet, and cable.

Family-owned hotel and restaurant in a restored farmhouse.

Located in St.-Germain-des-Prés, Relais Christine is a small boutique hotel just two blocks from the Seine. Built on the remains of a 13th-century abbey, the hotel incorporates original architectural elements such as centuries-old stone vaults that arch over the cavernous breakfast room.

An 18th-century former residence set in expansive gardens.

Le Corbusier's 1959 influential midcentury masterpiece still stands tall—12 stories to be precise—as a testament to pioneering postwar urbanist architecture. The massive, multicolored apartment block was designed to house 1,600 people in a vertical village

Three former residences in Provençal style (tile floors; arched stone ceilings), 2 swimming pools, an organic kitchen garden, and a stellar French restaurant with a 60,000-bottle cellar.

Formerly the Auberge de Cantobre.

Originally built as a wine exchange in 1609, the inn has 18 cozy rooms with exposed wooden beams and flat-screen TV’s. The owners, Marc and Carmen Rohfritsch, are an extremely cordial couple, and Marc makes an excellent sauerkraut at the restaurant.