Hotels in France

French entrepreneur Michel Reybier recently opened his sumptuous La Réserve, boasting more suites than rooms for a more intimate and elegant Parisian experience.

Paris' first explicitly "gay-friendly" hotel is romantic for straight couples, too. Located in the heart of the Marais, just 23 slick and modern rooms are spread throughout a purpose-built building and two houses.

The Molitor Pool used to be a meeting place for the glitterati into the 1930s, and the modern bikini was revealed there in the 1940s. Today, the popular hangout is part of a new hotel opened in 2014 offering a boutique experience and access to the renovated pool of yore.

Surrounded by theaters and the palatial Opera Garnier, the Hotel Indigo is one of the newest additions to the district, opened in 2015. Rooms, suites, and duplex apartments are all ideal for those who want to be in the center of Haussmann's great Parisian project.

The Generator Hostel in Paris is not your backpacker's hostel of yore. Sleek and edgy design make it an affordable selection for smart business travelers looking for something simple. Dorm rooms are available alongside double and single rooms, each stylish and modern, yet simple.

A single story of smooth whitewashed stucco erected around a courtyard paved with loose stones, La Quinta hews freely (very freely) to a traditional Chinese plan, with each wing serving a precise, dedicated function such as eating, receiving, and sleeping.

Fashion designer Catherine Painvin fled Paris for the Himalayas and finally ended up in Aubrac. The inn, with only six rooms—each more eccentric and wonderful than the last—is a favorite of connoisseurs.

The Location: A mile from Avignon in southeastern France, the medieval town of Villeneuve sits high on a rocky escarpment above the Rhône. Ivy twists up the walls of Hotel de l’Atelier, a pretty 16th-century maison that was a silk workshop in its last incarnation.

This high-design boutique hotel is surprisingly well priced considering its convenient location on a quiet side street close to the Place de la République and just five minutes from shopping in the Upper Marais.

Cluster of 14th-, 15th-, and 16th-century buildings housing 64 antiques-filled rooms (each named after a grand cru wine), in the heart of Burgundy wine country. 

Historically, provincial maisons d’hôtes are a lot of things—deliciously louche, impossibly cute, poignantly decrepit—but rarely are they scene-y. L’Ange et L’Éléphant is the almost freakish, salutary exception, an all-in-one inn, restaurant, café, tea salon, and boutique.