France

Things to do in France

From classic must-see sights to insider hot spots and local haunts, there are countless things to do in France. How do you decide? Start with our travel guide and get our favorite France attractions and activities—shops, museums, parks, nightclubs, coffee shops, tours, and more.

Our international team of editors and writers handpick the best things to do in France to help travelers discover authentic, local experiences. Whether a hidden boutique with handcrafted products, a popular local festival, a bakery with a cult following, or a picnic-worthy park, Travel + Leisure guides the way, providing information and inspiration. From beaches and bars to cultural attractions and up-and-coming neighborhoods, our list will help you make the most of your romantic getaway, family vacation, or trip with friends. Below find Travel + Leisure’s top picks for what to do in France.

The Charles de Gaulle airport is the first to offer Espaces Detente Service (Relaxation and Service Areas). The first of these multimedia "bars" are located in Terminal 2F in the baggage claim near carousels 21 and 26.

Held six times a year in and around Paris, the fair assembles in one spot up to 200 independent, small-scale producers from some 21 regions, including makers and growers of honey from the Auvergne; cider from Normandy; spice cake from Languedoc-Roussillon; Espelette pepper from the Pays Basque; l

New favorite: The just-renovated Alfonso XIII, a Luxury Collection Hotel, in Seville, with its spacious rooms decorated in Castilian, Andalusian, and Moorish styles. "Don't miss tapas at the hotel's Bodega Alfonso bar," Wolf says. Years as agent: 27.

The hotel's low-key yet elegant bar was once the favorite local watering hole of Errol Flynn (Orson Wells, Rita Hayworth, and Greta Garbo were regular patrons, too).

A restored Victorian gingerbread guinguette (drinking place) set in the leafy woods of Parc des Buttes Chaumont, Rosa Bonheur revives the 19th-century tradition of lazing away the afternoon drinking in the out-of-doors.

The legendary gallery has been selling affordably priced art for more than half a century, and its walls are lined with some of the most famous examples. For under $50, you can buy a Miró reproduction; lithographs by Braque and others cost $155.

For Bonpoint's iconic baby clothes—pin tucks! smocking! hand-knitted booties!—priced at 30 percent off, this French brand's Fin de Séries Outlet is the place to go on the Left Bank (Rive Gauche).

Pick up ingredients for a picnic lunch - olive breads and pizza with sautéed onions - at this colorful market. Open Tuesday-Sunday, 7 a.m.-1 p.m.

This public museum, just a 15-minute walk from the Arc de Triomphe, was once the home of art collector Édouard André and his wife, painter Nélie Jacquemart.

Never mind the fancy name, the "château" is actually a former prison—the Mediterranean equivalent of Alcatraz. Built in the 16th century, the island jail was the setting for Dumas's classic The Count of Monte Cristo. Today, the guards have been replaced with guides.

The local specialty is a layered praline paillardise.

Esteemed luggage manufacturer Goyard has been in business on the rue Saint-Honoré since 1853. Window displays of colorful totes catch the eyes of people passing by this brown storefront, marked with malletier (trunk maker).

Not your average Parisian boutique, Claude Nature on fashionable Boulevard Saint-Germain feels part natural history museum and part curiosity shop.