France

Things to do in France

From classic must-see sights to insider hot spots and local haunts, there are countless things to do in France. How do you decide? Start with our travel guide and get our favorite France attractions and activities—shops, museums, parks, nightclubs, coffee shops, tours, and more.

Our international team of editors and writers handpick the best things to do in France to help travelers discover authentic, local experiences. Whether a hidden boutique with handcrafted products, a popular local festival, a bakery with a cult following, or a picnic-worthy park, Travel + Leisure guides the way, providing information and inspiration. From beaches and bars to cultural attractions and up-and-coming neighborhoods, our list will help you make the most of your romantic getaway, family vacation, or trip with friends. Below find Travel + Leisure’s top picks for what to do in France.

Become a museum VIP and waltz right past the long lines with the Paris Museum Pass.

Designed by Jakob + MacFarlane at a pricetag exceeding $60 million, this dramatic green riverfront building is home to the French Institute of Fashion, where promising designers shape their talent.

Established by a pair of local fashion-industry refugees, this cult bath and body-care store elevates the basic Provençal soap to a supremely chic level. The soap bars, foams, and shower gels are stylishly packaged in simple beige cubes or crystal-clear bottles.

Tucked in a corner of the Tuileries Gardens near the Champs Élysées is this building reminiscent of a Greek temple, with large columns on its stone façade. Inside, is a rotating collection of photography, film, and video from the 19th to 21st centuries.

Famed for his fondness for treating shoes like pieces of clothing — fabrics and even zippers often adorn his designs — Bruno Frisoni sells whimsically unique shoes and colorful handbags at his popular Left Bank boutique on Rue de Grenelle.

It's all in the family at this brightly lit corner bakery in the Gambetta district that's named after founder Bernard Ganachaud's own la flûte gana (thin baguette), the moniker of which he patented.

The boutique for urban clothes horses carries women's fashions from Martin Margiela, Maria Calderara, and Ann Demeulemeester, as well as international labels, such as Yohji Yamamoto.

The late-19th-century building houses a satisfying number of Flemish and Dutch masters—including Rubens and van Dyck, and several first-rate landscapes by Jacob van Ruisdael—and notable 19th-century French paintings by Jacques-Louis David, Delacroix, and Corot.

Opened by Charles Drouant in 1880, this storied restaurant in Place Gaillon occupies the same building it has since its 19th-century founding as a tobacco bar.

Whether travelers seek a Chilean cruise, a snowmobile safari in Sweden, or winter in a villa on stilts in Maldives, Voyageurs du Monde makes it happen. For 30 years, this travel company has been committed to trips that offer “specialized destinations” catering to each client.

Housed in an 1826 Neoclassical retail arcade, Galerie du Passage has been visited by the likes of auction-house chairman Simon de Pury and Princess Caroline of Monaco.

Vélib’ is an affordable public bike-sharing system in Paris with approximately 20,000 two-wheelers and 1,800 stations. The three-speed gray bikes come with LED lights, a locking system, and a basket.

Buy traditional dishes in yellows and greens.