Florida

Restaurants in Florida

Florida cuisine is incredibly diverse, mixing European as well as African, Mexican, and Caribbean influences. Restaurants in Florida reflect these varied tastes and cultures. Bahamians, Haitians, Nicaraguans, Vietnamese, and many other cultures bring new tastes to local flavors.
There are plenty of ideas for picking Florida restaurants. Tap Tap is a colorful restaurant in Miami Beach serving up West African, French, and Caribbean fusion food. Try fried plantains, shrimp creole, or spicy conch ceviche, and top it off with a sip from their rum selection. For a famous dive-bar experience, try Singleton’s Seafood Shack in Atlantic Beach. This unassuming spot serves some of the best seafood Florida restaurants have to offer, without the fuss of white tablecloths or too much silverware.
Key Largo Conch House serves local craft beers and an excellent Key Lime Pie. Whether you feel like crepes, shrimp tacos or hush puppies, this spot will easily fill your dining needs. A purple cottage in Fernandina beach holds 29 South, a southern style bistro with farm-to-table food. It serves world cuisine with a modern twist, like lobster corn dogs and sweet tea brined pork chop, all by its famous chef, Scotty Schwartz.

The first family-owned David's Cafe's opened in the 1970's, serving Cuban cuisine, and was so popular that they opened a second location in 1993. David's Cafe II is open 24 hours and does the bulk of its business from the street-side, take-out window.

Luxe Italian steak house from Wise Guys star

Dreadlocked star chef Govind Armstrong has created dinner-as-theater here, with fussy service, a dramatic and soaring space, and a formal Los Angeles atmosphere.

This Little Havana eatery is widely popular with locals for its authentic Salvadorean cuisine and generous portions.

Jiko (“Jee-ko”) is Swahili for “the cooking place.” This African, Indian, and Mediterranean restaurant in Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom is decorated in earthtone colors and outfitted with a mix of blue-seated booths and padded chairs around wood tables.

In 2003, renowned chef Tim Andriola opened his Mediterranean-Italian restaurant, Timo, in Sunny Isles Beach. With seating for around 100 people, the dining room boasts red brick walls, brown leather seats, and tables covered in white linens.

The space serves filling Tex-Mex treats, plus local art for sale on the walls.

Try the mango salsa–drenched fish tacos at this low-lit couple-owned spot.

Known for its authentic, uncomplicated French fare, this Coral Gables restaurant is the namesake of chef Pascal Oudin, who studied under culinary legend Alain Ducasse.

Situated on a small private island, this oceanfront resort restaurant was chosen by Travel + Leisure as one of the nation’s most romantic dining destinations.

This unassuming, family-owned restaurant is easily recognizable by its green awning, Mexican murals, and large red, white, and green sign on the outside of the building. Rosita’s is no-frills, but it serves what is, arguably, the most authentic and flavorful Mexican food in the area.