Florida

Restaurants in Florida

Florida cuisine is incredibly diverse, mixing European as well as African, Mexican, and Caribbean influences. Restaurants in Florida reflect these varied tastes and cultures. Bahamians, Haitians, Nicaraguans, Vietnamese, and many other cultures bring new tastes to local flavors.
There are plenty of ideas for picking Florida restaurants. Tap Tap is a colorful restaurant in Miami Beach serving up West African, French, and Caribbean fusion food. Try fried plantains, shrimp creole, or spicy conch ceviche, and top it off with a sip from their rum selection. For a famous dive-bar experience, try Singleton’s Seafood Shack in Atlantic Beach. This unassuming spot serves some of the best seafood Florida restaurants have to offer, without the fuss of white tablecloths or too much silverware.
Key Largo Conch House serves local craft beers and an excellent Key Lime Pie. Whether you feel like crepes, shrimp tacos or hush puppies, this spot will easily fill your dining needs. A purple cottage in Fernandina beach holds 29 South, a southern style bistro with farm-to-table food. It serves world cuisine with a modern twist, like lobster corn dogs and sweet tea brined pork chop, all by its famous chef, Scotty Schwartz.

Situated on a small private island, this oceanfront resort restaurant was chosen by Travel + Leisure as one of the nation’s most romantic dining destinations.

This unassuming, family-owned restaurant is easily recognizable by its green awning, Mexican murals, and large red, white, and green sign on the outside of the building. Rosita’s is no-frills, but it serves what is, arguably, the most authentic and flavorful Mexican food in the area.

The restaurant is rightfully famous for its oysters and superb St. Johns River views. Deep-fried treats come in paper wrapping like an Old Florida pioneer outpost.

The working dock of City Seafood is still authentic and funky as hell, filled with patrons chucking the shells of just-eaten stone crabs into the water.

Health-minded sea grill

The restaurant is housed in a rebuilt historic cottage gutted by fire five years ago; the menu’s heavy on fish, of course—try the Gulf Coast sampler, groaning with scallops, grouper, shrimp, and crab cake.

YUCA, which stands for Young Upscale Cuban-American, caters to just that crowd, and power brokers and the political class love to network at this Miami Beach destination.

Opened in 1972, the Donut Gallery Diner has remained a favorite among Key Biscayne locals. Ironically, the restaurant does not sell donuts, but it does serve traditional “greasy spoon” breakfast and lunch dishes.

Located in Wynwood, this no-nonsense Latin American dive is known for fresh, affordable food.