Florida

Hotels in Florida

Try the juicy burgers at Caliente Resort’s poolside restaurant.

Just past the Everglades is this six-room Art Deco villa. The husband-and-wife owners stay behind the scene—breakfast (papaya yogurt, tropical fruit pastries) is delivered to your door, and guests can barbecue on the two outdoor grills.

A 1940 Art Deco masterpiece that served as a backdrop for many Esther Williams films, this hotel delivers the grace and pure fantasy of old-line Miami. After an Andre Balazs update in 2002, it's now filled with wicker furniture and done in a color scheme of muted tans and olive greens.

Bunk at one of the island’s best B&Bs, housed in one of Fernandina’s signature Victorians with central tower, 12-foot ceilings, mahogany staircase, and heart pine floors.

The latest proof that downtown Miami is heating up? The Beaux Arts, a hotel-within-a-hotel on floors 38 to 40 of the JW Marriott Marquis.

The time: 1940. The place: Walt Disney World's version of the Jersey Shore, complete with a boardwalk, surrey bikes, and saltwater taffy. The rooms: think old-fashioned floral.

Unsurpassed in terms of luxury when oil tycoon Henry Flagler built it in 1896, the Breakers outdid itself in a 1926 renovation modeled after various Italian renaissance palaces and gardens.

Celebrating its centennial in 2013, this Gulf Coast island gem has never strayed far from its Old Florida roots.

The newest outpost of the London-based boutique hotel and social club, the oceanfront Soho Beach House Miami was created by local architect Allan Shulman and designer Martin Brudnizki. Expect a Cecconi's Italian restaurant, a Cuban coffee bar, and a 100-foot-long beachside pool.

Set apart from the teeming ocean side of South Beach, the Mondrian holds a plum spot on the isle’s opposite shore along Biscayne Bay, with views of the glass towers of downtown.

Nautical-crisp digs on Orlando's Crescent Lake. When you're not conquering the World, you can take out one of the resort's pontoon boats, or tackle the three-acre pool complex—climb a ship's mast to get to the top of the waterslide.